Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study targets queen of northern seas

18.01.2005


The secret life of one of northern Australia’s most popular sportfish, the spectacular queenfish, is being studied by CSIRO scientists for clues to its role and abundance in the marine ecosystem.




The year-long study, co-funded by the National Oceans Office, is collecting more than 30 specimens a month from the Gulf of Carpentaria near Weipa where queenfish are caught by recreational anglers and inshore net fisheries. Results of the study will improve the ability of fisheries managers to sustain queenfish populations into the future.

CSIRO marine biologist Dr Shane Griffiths says queenfish are a major predator of commercially important prawns in the Northern Prawn Fishery, particularly in the Weipa region. Despite their prominence in estuarine and nearshore food webs little is known about the life cycle of queenfish. "By examining the gonads of queenfish specimens we hope to determine when they spawn, their age at sexual maturity, and the number of eggs produced by mature females," Dr Griffiths says.


"The number of annual growth bands in their otoliths (earbones) will give us clues to their ages and growth rates." "This information will shed light on how the natural population fluctuates, and how they might respond to certain levels of fishing, either as a target or bycatch species."

Dave Donald of Dave Donald Sportfishing Charters at Weipa, says queenfish are favoured by anglers for their size, good looks and athleticism. "They grow to more than a metre in length and can weigh up to 16 kilograms," Mr Donald says. "They are bright silver and are strong fighters on a line, making spectacular jumps when hooked." "This important research will provide the first account of what make this species tick."

National Oceans Office planning manager, Rowan Wylie, says information gathered during the project will contribute to the Australian Government’s regional marine plan for northern waters between Torres Strait and the eastern Arafura Sea, including the Gulf of Carpentaria. "Sustainable management of our oceans relies on the best possible information and this project will provide answers on an important species that has received comparatively little scientific attention," Mr Wylie says.

The queenfish specimens are being collected and sent to the CSIRO Marine Laboratories in Brisbane with the help of Dave Donald Sportfishing Charters, Weipa Sportfishing Club and local commercial fishers.

This study is part of ongoing research in support of the Northern Prawn Fishery and its ecosystem, which has been the focus of CSIRO investigations in the region for more than 40 years.

Contact:
Dr Shane Griffiths, CSIRO Marine Research on 07 3826 7364 or shane.griffiths@csiro.au

Photos of queenfish are available from:
Bryony Bennett, CSIRO Marine Research Communication Group on 03 6232 5261 or bryony.bennett@csiro.au

Simon Moore | CSIRO Media
Further information:
http://www.csiro.au

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Despite government claims, orangutan populations have not increased. Call for better monitoring
06.11.2018 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

nachricht Increasing frequency of ocean storms could alter kelp forest ecosystems
30.10.2018 | University of Virginia

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

Im Focus: Coping with errors in the quantum age

Physicists at ETH Zurich demonstrate how errors that occur during the manipulation of quantum system can be monitored and corrected on the fly

The field of quantum computation has seen tremendous progress in recent years. Bit by bit, quantum devices start to challenge conventional computers, at least...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Epoxy compound gets a graphene bump

14.11.2018 | Materials Sciences

Microgel powder fights infection and helps wounds heal

14.11.2018 | Health and Medicine

How algae and carbon fibers could sustainably reduce the athmospheric carbon dioxide concentration

14.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>