Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Climate Scientists Use The World’s Largest Supercomputer

01.04.2004


British meteorologists are to use the world’s largest supercomputer to help them predict the evolution of the Earth’s climate in the 21st century with unprecedented accuracy.



Scientists at the NCAS Centre for Global Atmospheric Modelling (CGAM), based at the University of Reading, have been awarded £700,000 from NERC to work with the state-of-the-art Earth Simulator in Yokohama, Japan. This is part of a formal collaboration between CGAM, the Met Office’s Hadley Centre, the University of Tokyo and the Earth Simulator Centre.

Housed in a special building the size of four tennis courts, the Earth Simulator is the world’s biggest and fastest supercomputer. Its 640 nodes, each consisting of eight powerful vector processors, are linked together by 83,000 high speed cables. The supercomputer has a sustained performance of 35.86 Teraflops and a main memory of 10 Terabytes.


The Earth Simulator’s immense capabilities allow the UK scientists to run new and highly detailed mathematical models of the Earth system. It will be possible to include important interactions between, for example, the climate and ecosystems, and to use much higher resolution to capture weather systems more faithfully.

Professor Julia Slingo, CGAM’s Director, says: "The Earth Simulator is 10 times more powerful than anything currently available to scientists in the UK. It will give us new insights into the processes that determine climate variability, such as El Nino, and interactions between the Gulf Stream and Atlantic weather systems.

"It will also help us determine how human behaviour will affect the climate in the coming decades, and will enable us to make more detailed assessments of the regional impacts of climate change, such as the increase in extreme events."

CGAM is also coordinating a major NERC Consortium on ‘Grand Challenge High Resolution Modelling of the Global Environment (UK-HiGEM)’. UK-HiGEM has been awarded £1.2 million over the next three years, which will be used to exploit the power of the new Research Council Supercomputer, HPCx. With the Earth Simulator Programme, UK-HiGEM will place Reading at the leading edge of climate modelling within the UK academic community.

Craig Hillsley | alfa
Further information:
http://www.cgam.nerc.ac.uk/index.php

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Despite government claims, orangutan populations have not increased. Call for better monitoring
06.11.2018 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

nachricht Increasing frequency of ocean storms could alter kelp forest ecosystems
30.10.2018 | University of Virginia

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

Im Focus: Coping with errors in the quantum age

Physicists at ETH Zurich demonstrate how errors that occur during the manipulation of quantum system can be monitored and corrected on the fly

The field of quantum computation has seen tremendous progress in recent years. Bit by bit, quantum devices start to challenge conventional computers, at least...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

New findings help to better calculate the oceans’ contribution to climate regulation

15.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Automated adhesive film placement and stringer integration for aircraft manufacture

15.11.2018 | Materials Sciences

Epoxy compound gets a graphene bump

14.11.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>