Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Brown expert connects resilience science and marine conservation

18.02.2008
Brown University marine conservation scientist Heather Leslie will explain how the fast-growing field of resilience science can produce more effective ocean protection policies at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society.

Resilience science is the study of how ecosystems resist and respond to disturbances, both natu-ral and man-made. This increasingly influential area of environmental science is affecting marine conservation efforts from the Gulf of Maine to the Great Barrier Reef.

At the meeting, held in Boston, Leslie will explain resilience science and its impact in a Feb. 17, 2008 symposium titled “Embracing Change: A New Vision for Management in Coastal Marine Ecosystems.” The symposium runs from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. in Room 313 of the Hynes Conven-tion Center. Leslie will also attend a Feb. 14, 2008 press briefing on the topic of marine ecosys-tem threats. The briefing kicks off at 1 p.m. in Room 112 of the Hynes Convention Center.

The Sharpe Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies and Biology at Brown, Leslie will dis-cuss at the symposium how ocean ecosystems are increasingly threatened by overfishing, pollu-tion, habitat loss, climate change and coastal development. Understanding why some ecosystems resist these shocks, and continue to deliver benefits such as plentiful fish and pristine beaches, and how others collapse is the subject of resilience science – a budding branch of study that combines approaches from both the life and social sciences.

“Resilience science examines how human and natural forces come together to affect an ecosys-tem’s ability to resist, recover or adapt to disturbances,” Leslie said. “That knowledge can be di-rectly applied to conservation policies – policies that can better protect the oceans.”

At the AAAS symposium, Leslie will explain key elements of resilience science. These include the recognition of the connections between marine systems and human communities, the mainte-nance of diversity in marine ecosystems and economies, and the importance of monitoring of the dynamic ecological processes, such as the rate of plankton production in the upper ocean, that create large-scale ecological patterns.

Leslie will also discuss how conservation policies based on resilience science are showing prom-ise around the world and across the United States, most notably in the Chesapeake Bay. Restora-tion of the Bay is underway – evidenced by oyster sanctuaries and eelgrass seeding – to restore lost diversity and increase future resilience.

“Viewing the world through a resilience lens means embracing change and acknowledging the tight connections between humans and nature,” Leslie said. “The way forward will require em-bracing change at many levels — in societal expectations, in business practices, in resource man-agement — to adapt to an ever-changing environment. Resilience science can show the way for-ward, creating more robust marine ecosystems and thriving human communities.”

Wendy Lawton | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.brown.edu

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Despite government claims, orangutan populations have not increased. Call for better monitoring
06.11.2018 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

nachricht Increasing frequency of ocean storms could alter kelp forest ecosystems
30.10.2018 | University of Virginia

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'

16.11.2018 | Health and Medicine

Good preparation is half the digestion

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Microscope measures muscle weakness

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>