Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New estimates on carbon emissions triggered by 300 years of cropland expansion in Northeast China

30.09.2014

The conversion of forests, grasslands, shrublands and wetlands to cropland over the course of three centuries profoundly changed the surface of the Earth and the carbon cycle of the terrestrial ecosystem in Northeast China.

In a new study published in the Beijing-based journal SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences, a team of researchers from Beijing Normal University, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, and the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, present new calculations on carbon emissions triggered by the expansion of cropland in this region between 1680 and 1980.


The image on the left depicts a reconstruction of pre-agriculture land cover, and the chart on the right shows carbon emissions from forest, grassland, wetland, and shrubland.

Credit: ©Science China Press

"Using regional land cover reconstructions from historical records, with a bookkeeping model, we estimated the carbon sink changes caused by historical cropland expansion in Northeast China during the past 300 years," state researchers Li Beibei, Fang Xiuqi, Ye Yu and Zhang Xuezhen.

In a new study titled, "Carbon emissions induced by cropland expansion in Northeast China during the past 300 years," these researchers state that during the three centuries until 1980, approximately 38% of the grassland and 20% of the forest and shrubland were converted to cropland.

"The carbon emission induced by cropland expansion between 1683 and 1980 was 1.06–2.55 Gt C(gigaton of carbon)," they state..

"The primary source of carbon emissions was forest reclamation (taking 60% of the total emissions in the moderate scenario), the secondary source was grassland cultivation (taking 27%), and the tertiary sources were shrubland and wetland reclamation (taking 13%)," they add.

"The carbon emission estimation in this study was lower than those in previous studies," they explain, "because of the improved land use data quality and various types of land use change considered."

These researchers reconstructed land cover during the period 1680-1980 by consulting historical documents including government files, Russian investigations in Northeast China, documents of the Manchurian Railway, and official statistics.

Both deforestation and grasslands reclamation for agricultural development has triggered large carbon emissions into the atmosphere. Land cover across Northeast China experienced dramatic changes during that period because of large-scale migration and agricultural development.

After Manchu warriors seized control of Beijing in 1644, they established the Qing Dynasty but closed off their homeland in northern Manchuria to migration by common Han Chinese citizens.

"The Qing Dynasty government then changed its policy from prohibiting to encouraging Han's migration for agriculture in the second half of the 19th century," state the researchers.

“The Hans’ migration and subsequent land reclamations resulted in a rapid increase of carbon emissions to 0.197 Gt C in 1850–1899, 0.758 Gt C in 1900–1949, and 0.371 Gt C in 1950–1980,” they explain.

From 1683 to 1980, between 35.5×103 and 97.4×103 square kilometers of forest were converted into cropland, along with 93.4×103 to 94.7×103 square kilometers of grassland, 23.1×103 to 61.8×103 square kilometers of shrubland, and 10×103 to 11.1×103 square kilometers of wetland.

Migration and the conversion of forests and grasslands into cultivated land proceeded northward, through what are now called Liaoning Province, Jilin Province, and Heilongjiang Province, from the end of the 1800s onward.

"Since 1900," the co-authors of the new study explain, "carbon emissions from Heilongjiang Province have greatly increased and even exceeded the total emissions of the other two provinces."

"During the 20th century," they add, "the largest increase in cropland occurred in Heilongjiang Province."

The co-authors of the new paper also explain that while previous studies focused mainly on carbon emissions from land use changes in terms of forest ecosystems, their research found that the conversion of non-forest ecosystems likewise played an important role in developing cropland and triggering carbon emissions.

"The carbon loss per unit area of the forest reclamation was larger than that in other, non-forest ecosystems, which caused the estimation in this study to be lower than Houghton et al.'s (2003) and Ge et al.'s (2008a) estimates," they state.

"The estimates of emissions from this study were lower than those from Houghton et al. (2003) and Ge et al. (2008a)," they add, "because this study used higher spatial resolution land use data based on historical documents and included disturbances of non-forest ecosystems such as steppe, shrub, and swamp."

###

This work was supported by the China Global Change Research Program (Grant No. 2010CB950103), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 40901099, 40571165), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Grant No. 2009SAP-2), and the Scientific Research Funds of Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology (Grant No. S8112090001).

See the article:

Li B B, Fang X Q, Ye Y, et al. 2014. Carbon emissions induced by cropland expansion in Northeast China during the past 300 years. SCIENCE CHINA: Earth Sciences, 57: 2259–2268, doi: 10.1007/s11430-014-4894-4

http://earth.scichina.com:8080/sciDe/EN/abstract/abstract515324.shtml

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11430-014-4894-4

SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences is produced by Science China Press, a leading publisher of scientific journals in China that operates under the auspices of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Science China Press presents to the world leading-edge advances made by Chinese scientists across a spectrum of fields. http://www.scichina.com/english/

Fang Xiuqi | Eurek Alert!

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Despite government claims, orangutan populations have not increased. Call for better monitoring
06.11.2018 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

nachricht Increasing frequency of ocean storms could alter kelp forest ecosystems
30.10.2018 | University of Virginia

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'

16.11.2018 | Health and Medicine

Good preparation is half the digestion

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Microscope measures muscle weakness

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>