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Global Amphibian Declines: Researchers complete first major survey of amphibian fungus in Asia

19.08.2011
A team of 33 researchers from 26 North American, European, Australian and Asian institutions has completed the first major survey in Asia of a deadly fungus which threatens large proportions of the world’s amphibians and has already wiped out more than 200 species.

From 2001 to 2009, the team surveyed more than 3,000 amphibians -- mostly frogs -- from 15 Asian countries, searching for any trace of the disease infecting the skin of the amphibians. The survey could help scientists to answer the question why the Chytrid fungus has been unusually devastating in many parts of the globe -- and why rapid population declines and extinctions are apparently absent in Asian amphibians.


Rana similis, one of the frog species in the Philippines with highest infaction caused by Bd
Foto: R. Brown

The globally emerging disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis or Bd, is next to habitat destruction one of the major driving forces in amphibian extinctions in Central, South and North America, Australia and Europe. The new Asian survey of the fungus, which was published Aug. 16 in the journal PLoS One by Andrea Swei, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, NY, USA, and colleagues, shows that Bd is prevalent at very low levels in the region.

“The study shows that ongoing research of the Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig - Leibniz Institute for Animal Biodiversity is very important for the conservation and inventorying of the global amphibian fauna” says Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Wägele, scientific director of the Forschungsmuseum Koenig.

“Amphibian diversity in Asia is very high and many of the frogs, toads and salamanders could potentially be vulnerable to Bd” Dennis Rödder, Curator for Herpetology at the Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig, Bonn, Germany, explains. “Unfortunately, we know very little about the fungus and its impact on the Asian biodiversity.”

"That's why we're excited about this first really big survey," says Vance Vredenburg, assistent professor at the University of California, Berkeley and leader of the research team. "If you look at chytrid worldwide, Asia's been the black hole in our data."

“Previous attempts to assess the potential distribution of the chytrid on a global scale already highlighted the high possibility that it might occur in huge parts of Asia” Rödder said. “The new data now allow s to assess the predictive abilities of our previously developed global extinction risk assessment for more than 6,000 species, which was published in 2009 in the Journal Diversity” .

From 2001 to 2009, the team surveyed more than 3,000 amphibians -- mostly frogs -- from 15 Asian countries, searching for any trace of the disease infecting the skin of the amphibians.

Thei results suggest that the prevalence of Bd was very low throughout the study sites, appearing in only 2.35 percent of the frogs. The Philippines, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Indonesia, Malaysia and South Korea were the only countries with any Bd infection.

“The distribution pattern of the chytrid in Asia is very patchy and therefore somewhat strange compared to its wave like emergence in other parts of the world” Rödder explains. “The new findings may indicate that Bd is either just emerging in Asia, or may have been in Asia at low levels for a long time” Alternatively, some other factor is preventing Bd from “fully invading Asian amphibians" the researchers write.

Due to the huge geographic coverage of the study, each site was only surveyed once and long-term observations are almost completely lacking, the researchers explained, so it's difficult to determine whether Bd infections in the countries are newly expanding. “It will be critical”, Vredenburg said, "to see how Bd prevalence is changing through time, because this is key to understanding the ultimate outcome of the disease."

If Bd has been in Asia for a long time, researchers would like to know why amphibians there have managed to co-exist with a fungus that has proved so destructive elsewhere. It is possible, for instance, that Asian amphibians might bear some sort of bacterial protection against Bd in their skins.

Other scientists are analyzing the genes of the Bd fungus collected globally, Vredenburg said, "to find out whether strains from different parts of the world also differ in their virulence."

And if Asia is on the brink of a chytrid epidemic, Swei and colleagues think it might start in the Philippines. "The prevalence and intensity of Bd infection is much higher here than anywhere else in Asia," she said. "Bd in the Philippines today looks similar to Bd in early outbreaks in California and South and Central America."

“This study is the first important step to understanding Bd in Asia," Vredenburg said. "It provides a solid foundation that future studies can build upon."

“The study has strong implications for the coordination of future conservation efforts”, Rödder said. “The possibility of another wave of extinctions as already observed in Central and South America highlights the need to follow the Asian survey with further monitoring programs. These are pivotal for emergency responses, such as captive breeding programs, which could save some species from extinction.”

Swei A, Rowley JJL, Rödder D, Diesmos MLL, Diesmos AC, et al. (2011) Is Chytridiomycosis an Emerging Infectious Disease in Asia?

PLoS ONE 6(8): e23179. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0023179

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0023179

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-08/sfsu-rcf081711.php

Rödder et al.: Global amphibian extinction risk assessment for the panzootic chytrid fungus. Diversity 2009, vol. 1, p. 52-66 (doi:10.3390/d1010052);

http://www.mdpi.com/journal/diversity .

Further Information

Dr. Dennis Rödder
Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig
Herpetologie
Adenauerallee 160
53113 Bonn
Tel. 0228 9122 250
E-Mail:
d.roedder.zfmk@uni-bonn.de
vor allem auch Bildmaterial:
Sabine Heine
Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig
Presse- und Öffentlichkeitsarbeit
Adenauerallee 160
53113 Bonn
Tel. 0228 9122 215
E-Mail:
s.heine.zfmk@uni-bonn.de
The Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig (ZFMK) is an independent research institute of the state of Northrhine-Westphalia. As a member of the Leibniz-Gemeinschaft (WGL) the ZFMK is jointly funded by the state of Northrhine-Westphalia, the other states of Germany and the federal government.

Research fields exercised at a worldwide scale are biodiversity in terrestrial habitats, taxonomy and systematics of terrestrial vertebrates and arthropods (including the limnetic fauna) and evolutionary biology. This research is based on the extensive scientific collections of the Museum. As databases of life they are the indispensable reference source for all profound analyses of biodiversity on earth.

The Leibniz Association is a network of 87 scientifically, legally and economically independent research institutes and scientific service facilities. Leibniz Institutes perform strategic- and thematically-oriented research and offer scientific service of national significance while striving to find scientific solutions for major social challenges.

Leibniz Institutes employ 16.800 employees, of which 7.800 are academics, including 3.300 junior scientists. One indication of their high competitiveness and excellence is the 330 million euros allocated to the Leibniz Institutes from third-party funds.

The Institutes have been awarded 42 million euros from the European Union, 55 million euros from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation, DFG) and 51 million euros from industry co-operations. The total budget of all Leibniz Institutes amounts to more than 1.4 billion euros.

Leibniz Institutes contribute to clusters of excellence in fields such as Mathematics, Optic Technologies, Materials Research, Medicine, Climate and Environmental Research, Bio- and Nanotechnology as well as humanities, economics and social sciences. They foster close co-operations with universities, industry, and other research institutes, both in Germany and abroad. The Leibniz Association has developed a comprehensive system of quality management. At regular intervals, independent experts assess every institute as part of their unique peer review evaluation process.

Sabine Heine | idw
Further information:
http://www.museumkoenig.uni-bonn.de/
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0023179

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