Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Machine monitoring system increases availability and productivity in manufacturing and process industries

21.11.2011
The Siplus CMS2000 from the Siemens Industry Automation Division is a system for monitoring machines which helps companies to increase the availability of their plants and selectively plan maintenance work. The modular condition monitoring system (CMS) is suitable for monitoring and analyzing mechanical components in individual machines and complex drive trains.

The Siplus CMS2000 from the Siemens Industry Automation Division is a system for monitoring machines which helps companies to increase the availability of their plants and selectively plan maintenance work.


The Siplus CMS2000 from the Siemens Industry Automation Division is a system for monitoring machines which helps companies to increase the availability of their plants and selectively plan maintenance work.

The Siemens Industry Automation Division is expanding its range of plant monitoring systems with the Siplus CMS2000. The system can monitor and analyze mechanical components like motors, generators, pumps or fans by recording vibrations, rotational speeds and temperature. This makes it possible to detect and remedy potential defects in machines before they occur, enabling maintenance work to be planned reliably. The result is increased plant availability and productivity, and reduced repair and maintenance costs.

Siplus CMS2000 offers two standard IEPE interfaces for connecting vibration sensors as well as one speed input, two analog inputs, two digital inputs, and three digital outputs. The modular system can also be expanded by temperature modules from the Simocode family. Further modules will be available soon. The integral diagnostics software means users can evaluate characteristic values of the bearing and vibration monitoring system and perform a frequency-selective analysis of the recorded data as well as a trend analysis.

Siplus CMS2000 can be visualized and parameterized easily by using a web browser without additional software. This allows service personnel problem-free local access even with remote operation. In addition, the system informs personnel by e-mail of the status of the plant and, if required, it can provide the raw data. Internet access is password-protected. The internet-connected company server should be equipped with a firewall to provide additional protection. Alternatively, online access is possible via the secure cRSP platform from Siemens within the scope of a service agreement.

With the combined functionality of monitoring and analysis, Siplus CMS2000 supplements the Siplus CMS product range that until now encompassed the Siplus CMS1000 system for simple machine monitoring and the powerful Siplus CMS4000 system for complex analysis and measuring tasks.

Siemens has developed the Siplus CMS monitoring systems specifically for monitoring plants and machines. The aim is to enlist the help of condition monitoring systems to increase plant availability as the most powerful lever for boosting productivity. The Siplus CMS helps to detect fault sources at an early stage and scheduled maintenance work can be carried out at suitable points in the production cycle. After extended periods of fault-free operation, any significant irregularities resulting from wear and tear or other damage-related causes can be detected at the outset using the documented trend curves. Predictable problems can thus be corrected as they arise – before more significant damage, cost-intensive consequential damage, or even total failure results. Condition monitoring systems from Siemens are used worldwide in a host of production plants and in different sectors such as mechanical equipment manufacture, pulp and paper, renewable energy, metals and mining, oil and gas, and the automotive industry.

The Siemens Industry Sector (Erlangen, Germany) is the world's leading supplier of innovative and environmentally friendly products and solutions for industrial customers. With end-to-end automation technology and industrial software, solid vertical-market expertise, and technology-based services, the Sector enhances its customers' productivity, efficiency, and flexibility. With a global workforce of more than 100,000 employees, the Industry Sector comprises the Divisions Industry Automation, Drive Technologies and Customer Services as well as the Business Unit Metals Technologies. For more information, visit http://www.siemens.com/industry

The Siemens Industry Automation Division (Nuremberg, Germany) supports the entire value chain of its industrial customers – from product design to production and services – with an unmatched combination of automation technology, industrial control technology, and industrial software. With its software solutions, the Division can shorten the time-to-market of new products by up to 50 percent. Industry Automation comprises five Business Units: Industrial Automation Systems, Control Components and Systems Engineering, Sensors and Communications, Siemens PLM Software, and Water Technologies. For more information, visit http://www.siemens.com/industryautomation

Reference Number: IIA2011112906e

Contact
Mr. Peter Jefimiec
Industry Automation Division
Siemens AG
Gleiwitzerstr. 555
90475 Nuremberg
Germany
Tel: +49 (911) 895-7975
peter.jefimiec​@siemens.com

Peter Jefimiec | Siemens Industry
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/siplus-cms

More articles from Machine Engineering:

nachricht Additively manufactured rocket engine features an aerospike nozzle for microlaunchers
12.02.2020 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS

nachricht Photonics meets textile engineering: faster CFRP component manufacturing with an ultrashort pulsed laser and robot
30.01.2020 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

All articles from Machine Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Freiburg researcher investigate the origins of surface texture

Most natural and artificial surfaces are rough: metals and even glasses that appear smooth to the naked eye can look like jagged mountain ranges under the microscope. There is currently no uniform theory about the origin of this roughness despite it being observed on all scales, from the atomic to the tectonic. Scientists suspect that the rough surface is formed by irreversible plastic deformation that occurs in many processes of mechanical machining of components such as milling.

Prof. Dr. Lars Pastewka from the Simulation group at the Department of Microsystems Engineering at the University of Freiburg and his team have simulated such...

Im Focus: Skyrmions like it hot: Spin structures are controllable even at high temperatures

Investigation of the temperature dependence of the skyrmion Hall effect reveals further insights into possible new data storage devices

The joint research project of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) that had previously demonstrated...

Im Focus: Making the internet more energy efficient through systemic optimization

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, recently completed a 5-year research project looking at how to make fibre optic communications systems more energy efficient. Among their proposals are smart, error-correcting data chip circuits, which they refined to be 10 times less energy consumptive. The project has yielded several scientific articles, in publications including Nature Communications.

Streaming films and music, scrolling through social media, and using cloud-based storage services are everyday activities now.

Im Focus: New synthesis methods enhance 3D chemical space for drug discovery

After helping develop a new approach for organic synthesis -- carbon-hydrogen functionalization -- scientists at Emory University are now showing how this approach may apply to drug discovery. Nature Catalysis published their most recent work -- a streamlined process for making a three-dimensional scaffold of keen interest to the pharmaceutical industry.

"Our tools open up whole new chemical space for potential drug targets," says Huw Davies, Emory professor of organic chemistry and senior author of the paper.

Im Focus: Quantum fluctuations sustain the record superconductor

Superconductivity approaching room temperature may be possible in hydrogen-rich compounds at much lower pressures than previously expected

Reaching room-temperature superconductivity is one of the biggest dreams in physics. Its discovery would bring a technological revolution by providing...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

70th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Around 70 Laureates set to meet with young scientists from approx. 100 countries

12.02.2020 | Event News

11th Advanced Battery Power Conference, March 24-25, 2020 in Münster/Germany

16.01.2020 | Event News

Laser Colloquium Hydrogen LKH2: fast and reliable fuel cell manufacturing

15.01.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Time-resolved measurement in a memory device

19.02.2020 | Physics and Astronomy

Mixed-signal hardware security thwarts powerful electromagnetic attacks

19.02.2020 | Information Technology

Could water solve the renewable energy storage challenge?

19.02.2020 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>