Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

High-speed torque limiting clutches for test stands with extremely high torques

12.08.2013
Mayr power transmission is now to complete its torque limiting clutches for high-speed applications through a large series with high torques.

Besides the "EAS-HSC", the "EAS-HSE" (High-Speed Elements) now transmits significantly higher speeds – as a special version, even up to 20,000 rpm. This clutch with a disengaging mechanism is therefore suitable for operation in all test stands which require large clutches.


The EAS-HSE series is based on the tried and tested design principles of the "EAS-Elements".

The EAS-HSE series is based the design principles of the "EAS-Elements", which have proven their worth over decades, and has been designed for the extreme demands set by test stand technology in high torque ranges. For large clutches with high torques, the clutch specialist applies several overload elements across as large a diameter as possible.

As a result, significantly higher torques are realisable than with a central disengaging mechanism. In the standard version, speed values of up to 12,000 rpm are permitted; in a special version even up to 20,000 rpm.

The separation of input and output occurs almost residual torque-free with high switch-off and repetitive accuracies. Due to the axial stroke of the bolt or ball carrier, the control segments move radially outwards, thereby disconnecting the components axially. The elements do not re-engage automatically, but instead remain separated until they are re-engaged manually, or using a device. The position for synchronous re-engagement to maintain balance quality is clearly marked on the clutch.

As a result, the EAS-HSE provides a reliable and precise torque limitation, and, thanks to the complete separation of the drive line, does not cause engagement impacts. The basic prerequisite for use of a torque limiting clutch in high-speed applications is, among other things, the high balance quality of every individual component in order to achieve optimum running smoothness of the drive line in combination with the other components. The clutches have an extremely compact design and permit a low-backlash high performance density. Furthermore, the reduction of the rotating masses has a positive effect on the running smoothness and the machine dynamics.

Three sizes for torques from 100 to 8400 Nm have been realised in the EAS-HSE series up until now. Depending on their size, they are permitted for speedvalues from 6000 to 12,000 rpm. Four further sizes are planned. The complete series will in future cover torques of up to 25,000 Nm and speeds of up to 16.000 rpm. Due to their characteristics, the new torque limiting clutches of the EAS-HSE series are not only suitable for test stands, but also for all other high-speed drive axes.

Contact:
Chr. Mayr GmbH + Co. KG, Eichenstraße 1, 87665 Mauerstetten, Dipl.-Ing. (FH) Hermann Bestle
Tel.: 08341/804-232, Fax: 08341/804-49232
Email: hermann.bestle@mayr.de, Web: http://www.mayr.com

Hermann Bestle | Chr. Mayr GmbH + Co KG
Further information:
http://www.mayr.com

More articles from Machine Engineering:

nachricht A sensor system learns to "hear": Reliable detection of failures in machines and systems
05.12.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfverfahren IZFP

nachricht Thick metal sheets? Laser welding!
30.11.2018 | Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

All articles from Machine Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

Im Focus: The force of the vacuum

Scientists from the Theory Department of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg have shown through theoretical calculations and computer simulations that the force between electrons and lattice distortions in an atomically thin two-dimensional superconductor can be controlled with virtual photons. This could aid the development of new superconductors for energy-saving devices and many other technical applications.

The vacuum is not empty. It may sound like magic to laypeople but it has occupied physicists since the birth of quantum mechanics.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

Inaugural "Virtual World Tour" scheduled for december

28.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

A new molecular player involved in T cell activation

07.12.2018 | Life Sciences

High-temperature electronics? That's hot

07.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

Supercomputers without waste heat

07.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>