Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Clean lungs thanks to laser process exhaustion

19.06.2019

“CleanRemote” protects work environment against hazardous micro dust

In sectors such as the automotive industry, components can be processed at extremely high speed using the laser remote process. However, this can result in harmful emissions which may cause lung damage.


The laser remote system moves the laser beam at up to 10 m/s over the component. The metal surface is cleaned and provided with a groove structure.

© Fraunhofer IWS Dresden


The Multi Remote System (MuReA) by Fraunhofer IWS welds, cuts and structures components on a large scale and productively with high-power lasers.

© Fraunhofer IWS Dresden

Scientists from the Dresden Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS have studied the issue as part of the IGF research project “CleanRemote”. They reduce particles and gases in the air by means of a suction device.

Mechanical engineering, shipbuilding, aviation – laser remote processing has been increasingly gaining ground in the industry for several years. Whereas in the past it was only possible to laser machine one part after the other, this process now allows parts up to one meter in size to be cut, welded, ablated or structured at different points virtually simultaneously.

Nevertheless, although this works well, there is a problem: “The process operates with a high intensity of several kilowatts within a few seconds. This produces harmful emissions such as small particles and gases,” explains Annett Klotzbach from Fraunhofer IWS in Dresden.

As part of the IGF research project “CleanRemote”, the Group Manager Bonding and Composite Technology has been working on the topic in recent years. Concrete results are now available.

Suction reduces health risks

With a particular suction device the risk for plant operators will be reduced. They are especially endangered when a production line is reloaded and therefore has to be opened. Particles can then escape and damage the operator's lungs. The research was initiated by the question in which direction the small particles move, hardly visible to the naked eye.

“This can be quite different because some particles are larger than others. The large ones generate more kinetic energy and therefore fly higher,” says Annett Klotzbach. In addition, the laser moves from one position to another within milliseconds by means of tilting mirrors, thereby complicating the calculations.

“Our partners from the Chair of Inorganic Chemistry at TU Dresden have therefore developed a flow computer model to enable us to understand the particle trajectory. With this data, we finally optimize the suction devices,” says Annett Klotzbach.

In addition to specifically arranged suction hoods, the scientists also installed a so-called transverse jet. “For particles located far from the suction hoods, it is necessary to use such a device. They are blown from one side to the other and then sucked out.” Residual soiling will also be removed by CO2 snow blasting, explains the scientist.

Meet occupational safety and environmental protection requirements

Annett Klotzbach and her team have worked for two and a half years on the project together with the cooperation partner. The results will now benefit those industries, in which laser remote processing is of particular importance, for example in those cases, in which the steel frame of a car seat is welded or a metallic surface has to be cleaned and roughened in order to bond carbon parts.

“Laser remote processing with high-performance lasers will continue to find its way into the market, especially among small and medium-sized companies. You can benefit from our research results in order to meet the requirements of occupational health and safety and environmental protection law in the best possible way,” says Annett Klotzbach.

In mid-June she will present the process to a specialist audience for the first time at the “LASER World of PHOTONICS” trade fair in Munich.

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Annett Klotzbach
Group Manager Bonding and Composite Technology
Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS
annett.klotzbach@iws.fraunhofer.de
Phone +49 351 83391-3235
Winterbergstraße 28, 01277 Dresden

www.iws.fraunhofer.de

Originalpublikation:

https://www.iws.fraunhofer.de/en/pressandmedia/press_releases/2019/presseinforma...

Markus Forytta | Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS

More articles from Machine Engineering:

nachricht How interstitial ordering affects high-strength steels
14.05.2020 | Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH

nachricht Reprogramming of macroscopic self-assembly with dynamic boundaries
14.05.2020 | Max-Planck-Institut für Intelligente Systeme

All articles from Machine Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: I-call - When microimplants communicate with each other / Innovation driver digitization - "Smart Health“

Microelectronics as a key technology enables numerous innovations in the field of intelligent medical technology. The Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT coordinates the BMBF cooperative project "I-call" realizing the first electronic system for ultrasound-based, safe and interference-resistant data transmission between implants in the human body.

When microelectronic systems are used for medical applications, they have to meet high requirements in terms of biocompatibility, reliability, energy...

Im Focus: When predictions of theoretical chemists become reality

Thomas Heine, Professor of Theoretical Chemistry at TU Dresden, together with his team, first predicted a topological 2D polymer in 2019. Only one year later, an international team led by Italian researchers was able to synthesize these materials and experimentally prove their topological properties. For the renowned journal Nature Materials, this was the occasion to invite Thomas Heine to a News and Views article, which was published this week. Under the title "Making 2D Topological Polymers a reality" Prof. Heine describes how his theory became a reality.

Ultrathin materials are extremely interesting as building blocks for next generation nano electronic devices, as it is much easier to make circuits and other...

Im Focus: Rolling into the deep

Scientists took a leukocyte as the blueprint and developed a microrobot that has the size, shape and moving capabilities of a white blood cell. Simulating a blood vessel in a laboratory setting, they succeeded in magnetically navigating the ball-shaped microroller through this dynamic and dense environment. The drug-delivery vehicle withstood the simulated blood flow, pushing the developments in targeted drug delivery a step further: inside the body, there is no better access route to all tissues and organs than the circulatory system. A robot that could actually travel through this finely woven web would revolutionize the minimally-invasive treatment of illnesses.

A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI-IS) in Stuttgart invented a tiny microrobot that resembles a white blood cell...

Im Focus: NASA's Curiosity rover finds clues to chilly ancient Mars buried in rocks

By studying the chemical elements on Mars today -- including carbon and oxygen -- scientists can work backwards to piece together the history of a planet that once had the conditions necessary to support life.

Weaving this story, element by element, from roughly 140 million miles (225 million kilometers) away is a painstaking process. But scientists aren't the type...

Im Focus: Making quantum 'waves' in ultrathin materials

Study co-led by Berkeley Lab reveals how wavelike plasmons could power up a new class of sensing and photochemical technologies at the nanoscale

Wavelike, collective oscillations of electrons known as "plasmons" are very important for determining the optical and electronic properties of metals.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Dresden Nexus Conference 2020: Same Time, Virtual Format, Registration Opened

19.05.2020 | Event News

Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium AWK'21 will take place on June 10 and 11, 2021

07.04.2020 | Event News

International Coral Reef Symposium in Bremen Postponed by a Year

06.04.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Inexpensive retinal diagnostics via smartphone

25.05.2020 | Medical Engineering

Smart machine maintenance: New AI system also detects unknown faults

25.05.2020 | Information Technology

Artificial Intelligence for optimized mobile communication

25.05.2020 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>