Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

With Gallium Nitride for a Powerful 5G Cellular Network - EU project “5G GaN2” started

17.09.2018

The cellular network of the fifth generation (5G) shall enable data transmission between humans, devices and machines in real time. So far, no technology exists that allows for a reliable, fast and energy-efficient 5G network. In the EU project “5G GaN2”, 17 partners from research and industry joined forces, in order to develop cost-effective and high-performance technologies, based on gallium nitride, for the upcoming mobile communications standard. The consortium, which also includes the Fraunhofer IAF, started its work in July 2018.

To date, primary humans communicate via the wireless radio network. In the cellular network of the fifth generation (5G), however, also cars, devices and production machines shall transmit data in real time. In the future, these high data rates will be covered by frequency bands in the millimeter wave range (>24GHz).


The E-band amplifier chip that is developed at the Fraunhofer IAF measures only 4 x 2,5 mm².

© Fraunhofer IAF


Dr. Dirk Schwantuschke is a group manager in the microelectronics department and supervises the project “5G GaN2” on the part of the Fraunhofer IAF.

© Fraunhofer IAF

They provide a ten times higher band width in comparison to currently available frequency
bands (< 3 GHz) and have now been released internationally to significantly increase the bandwidth range. Yet, these new frequency ranges cannot be served efficiently with present mobile and antenna technology.

“Therefore, it is necessary to improve the available output power and energy-efficiency of the net infrastructure for these innovative frequency bands, through the use of advanced gallium nitride technology”, says Dr. Dirk Schwantuschke, who is managing the project on the part of the Fraunhofer IAF. In the project “5G GaN2” components, parts and circuits for the 5G base stations will be developed on the basis of gallium nitride (GaN). “The contribution of the Fraunhofer IAF to the overall project will be the development of power amplifiers in E-band, the frequency range around 80 GHz”, explains Schwantuschke.

Lowering Cost and Improving Performance

Base stations are the junctions of cellular networks. They record the transmitted data of a radio cell and pass them on. To ensure a flood of data via frequency bands in millimeter wave range in the future, the technologies of base stations need to fulfill two criteria: the output power needs to be improved while keeping the cost and the energy consumption low at the same time.

To achieve these goals, the project partners of “5G GaN2” count on GaN based technology and amplifier circuits. Electronic components and systems based on GaN are significantly more energy-efficient than conventional components made of silicon (Si). The GaN components will optionally be applied on cost-efficient Si substrates. Another aspect of the project is the combination of various components in a single case, through innovative approaches in regard of packaging technologies, in order to reduce costs.

Aim of the project is the realization of demonstrators at 28 GHz, 38 GHz and 80 GHz. These demonstrators shall serve as key technologies for the development of a powerful and energy-efficient 5G cellular network based on GaN. ECSEL, an initiative of the European Commission, promotes the three-year joint project, consisting out of 17 project partners from seven countries. ECSEL supports development, research and innovation in the field of electronics, by bringing various partners from industry, research and public sphere together.

Development of Amplifiers at the Fraunhofer IAF

The Fraunhofer IAF has particular know-how on the development of amplifiers based on GaN. “GaN-based devices are especially well suited for powerful high frequency amplifiers that are required for base stations and the infrastructure of the cellular network, as it allows to provide high frequencies at high power. The amplifiers developed at the Fraunhofer IAF are capable of sending more data faster and energy-efficient through the cellular network”, says Schwantuschke.

The consortium of the project includes, besides the Fraunhofer IAF, the complete value chain of the mobile phone technology: wafer suppliers, semiconductor manufacturers and system integrators develop together with universities and research institutes innovative GaN based technologies for the cellular network of the fifth generation.

For more information please visit https://www.5ggan2.eu/.


About Fraunhofer IAF

The Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF ranks among the leading research institutions in the area of compound semiconductors. Based on these semiconductors, IAF develops electronic and optoelectronic devices as well as integrated circuits and systems. In a clean room of 1000 m² and additional laboratory space covering 3000 m2, epitaxy and processing equipment as well as measurement technologies are available to realize high frequency circuits for communication technology, voltage converter modules for electrical engineering, infrared and UV detectors for safety and security applications, as well as infrared laser systems for medical technology. Important innovations of the institute include high brightness white light-emitting diodes for lighting technology, energy-efficient power amplifiers for mobile communications and highly sensitive laser systems for real-time spectroscopy.

Originalpublikation:

https://www.iaf.fraunhofer.de/en/media-library/press-releases/5G-GaN2.html

Weitere Informationen:

https://www.5ggan2.eu/
http://www.iaf.fraunhofer.de

Anne-Julie Maurer | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Festkörperphysik IAF

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht High-speed surveillance in solar cells catches recombination red-handed
14.02.2019 | Osaka University

nachricht Sodium is the new lithium: Researchers find a way to boost sodium-ion battery performance
04.02.2019 | Nagoya Institute of Technology

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Regensburg physicists watch electron transfer in a single molecule

For the first time, an international team of scientists based in Regensburg, Germany, has recorded the orbitals of single molecules in different charge states in a novel type of microscopy. The research findings are published under the title “Mapping orbital changes upon electron transfer with tunneling microscopy on insulators” in the prestigious journal “Nature”.

The building blocks of matter surrounding us are atoms and molecules. The properties of that matter, however, are often not set by these building blocks...

Im Focus: University of Konstanz gains new insights into the recent development of the human immune system

Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens

Cell biologists from the University of Konstanz shed light on a recent evolutionary process in the human immune system and publish their findings in the...

Im Focus: Transformation through Light

Laser physicists have taken snapshots of carbon molecules C₆₀ showing how they transform in intense infrared light

When carbon molecules C₆₀ are exposed to an intense infrared light, they change their ball-like structure to a more elongated version. This has now been...

Im Focus: Famous “sandpile model” shown to move like a traveling sand dune

Researchers at IST Austria find new property of important physical model. Results published in PNAS

The so-called Abelian sandpile model has been studied by scientists for more than 30 years to better understand a physical phenomenon called self-organized...

Im Focus: Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components

Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures. With a combination of cryo-force spectroscopy and computer simulations, they were able to show that DNA molecules behave like a chain of small coil springs. The researchers reported their findings in Nature Communications.

DNA is not only a popular research topic because it contains the blueprint for life – it can also be used to produce tiny components for technical applications.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Global Legal Hackathon at HAW Hamburg

11.02.2019 | Event News

The world of quantum chemistry meets in Heidelberg

30.01.2019 | Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Gravitational waves will settle cosmic conundrum

15.02.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Spintronics by 'straintronics'

15.02.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Platinum nanoparticles for selective treatment of liver cancer cells

15.02.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>