Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Scientists create biodegradable, paper-based biobatteries

08.08.2018

Proposed design is easy to produce, low-cost, flexible and more efficient than previously proposed paper-based batteries

The batteries of the future may be made out of paper. Researchers at Binghamton University, State University at New York have created a biodegradable, paper-based battery that is more efficient than previously possible.


Researchers at Binghamton University, State University at New York have created a biodegradable, paper-based battery that is more efficient than previously possible.

Credit: Seokheun 'Sean' Choi

For years, there has been excitement in the scientific community about the possibility of paper-based batteries as an eco-friendly alternative. However, the proposed designs were never quite powerful enough, they were difficult to produce and it was questionable whether they were really biodegradable.

This new design solves all of those problems.

Associate Professor Seokheun "Sean" Choi from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and Professor Omowunmi Sadik from the Chemistry Department worked on the project together. Choi engineered the design of the paper-based battery, while Sadik was able to make the battery a self-sustaining biobattery.

"There's been a dramatic increase in electronic waste and this may be an excellent way to start reducing that," said Choi. "Our hybrid paper battery exhibited a much higher power-to-cost ratio than all previously reported paper-based microbial batteries."

The biobattery uses a hybrid of paper and engineered polymers. The polymers - poly (amic) acid and poly (pyromellitic dianhydride-p-phenylenediamine) - were the key to giving the batteries biodegrading properties. The team tested the degradation of the battery in water and it clearly biodegraded without the requirements of special facilities, conditions or introduction of other microorganisms.

The polymer-paper structures are lightweight, low-cost and flexible. Choi said that flexibility also provides another benefit.

"Power enhancement can be potentially achieved by simply folding or stacking the hybrid, flexible paper-polymer devices," said Choi.

The team said that producing the biobatteries is a fairly straightforward process and that the material allows for modifications depending on what configuration is needed.

###

The research paper, titled "Green Biobatteries: Hybrid Paper-Polymer Microbial Fuel Cells," was published in Advanced Sustainable Systems.

The work was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation and done through the Center for Research in Advanced Sensing Technologies and Environmental Sustainability (CREATES).

Media Contact

Seokheun 'Sean' Choi
sechoi@binghamton.edu
607-777-5913

 @binghamtonu

http://www.binghamton.edu 

Seokheun 'Sean' Choi | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adsu.201800041

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Ricocheting radio waves monitor the tiniest movements in a room
07.08.2018 | Duke University

nachricht Touring IPP’s fusion devices per virtual-reality viewer
07.08.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: World record: Fastest 3-D tomographic images at BESSY II

The quality of materials often depends on the manufacturing process. In casting and welding, for example, the rate at which melts solidify and the resulting microstructure of the alloy is important. With metallic foams as well, it depends on exactly how the foaming process takes place. To understand these processes fully requires fast sensing capability. The fastest 3D tomographic images to date have now been achieved at the BESSY II X-ray source operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin.

Dr. Francisco Garcia-Moreno and his team have designed a turntable that rotates ultra-stably about its axis at a constant rotational speed. This really depends...

Im Focus: A molecular switch may serve as new target point for cancer and diabetes therapies

If certain signaling cascades are misregulated, diseases like cancer, obesity and diabetes may occur. A mechanism recently discovered by scientists at the Leibniz- Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin and at the University of Geneva has a crucial influence on such signaling cascades and may be an important key for the future development of therapies against these diseases. The results of the study have just been published in the prestigious scientific journal 'Molecular Cell'.

Cell growth and cell differentiation as well as the release and efficacy of hormones such as insulin depend on the presence of lipids. Lipids are small...

Im Focus: Touring IPP’s fusion devices per virtual-reality viewer

ASDEX Upgrade and Wendelstein 7-X – as if you were there / 360° view of fusion research

You seem to be standing in the plasma vessel looking around: Where otherwise plasmas with temperatures of several million degrees are being investigated, with...

Im Focus: Concepts for new switchable plasmonic nanodivices

A magneto-plasmonic nanoscale router and a high-contrast magneto-plasmonic disk modulator controlled by external magnetic fields

Plasmonic waveguides open the possibility to develop dramatically miniaturized optical devices and provide a promising route towards the next-generation of...

Im Focus: 26AlF – the first detection of a radioactive molecule in space

The first unambiguous observation of a radioactive molecule, 26AlF, was made in the ancient nova-like object CK Vul (or Nova Vul 1670), which - most likely - is a stellar-merger remnant. The eruption of the object was observed between 1670-1672 in Europe. The interest in this object has been recently rejuvenated by the discovery of molecular gas of a very peculiar isotopic composition in the remnant.
The finding was announced by an international research team led by Tomasz Kamiński (CfA), including Karl Menten (MPIfR Bonn).

The variable star CK Vulpeculae (CK Vul) is known as the location of a stellar outbreak, a nova, which was observed by European astronomers in the 17th century...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

2018 Work Research Conference

25.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

A molecular switch may serve as new target point for cancer and diabetes therapies

08.08.2018 | Life Sciences

A love of steel

08.08.2018 | Materials Sciences

Novel approach to coherent control of a three-level quantum system

08.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>