Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Safe Lithium Batteries with a Long Service Life

09.09.2014

With the help of new materials and additional improvements, researchers at Siemens have managed to make lithium-ion batteries safer and extend their service life.

As part of the joint research project Intrinsically Safe Battery (EiSiBatt), which is funded by the German Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, the engineers developed a new cell chemistry until it was sufficiently mature for general application.


As a result, it is now possible to create lithium-ion batteries that are very safe, even when they are overcharged, and that last for a much higher number of charge-discharge cycles (20,000) than the previous top value of around 5,000.

Lithium-ion batteries are very attractive energy storage systems, due to their high energy densities. In Siemens products alone, their areas of application range from small energy storage systems for hearing aids to medium-size storage systems for cranes and machine tools, and large storage systems for power grids.

... more about:
»Energy »Lithium »batteries »battery »voltage

The anodes of the new battery cells do not consist of graphite, as is usually the case, but of lithium titanate, while the cathodes are made of lithium iron phosphate instead of a lithium-metal oxide.

In addition, scientists at Siemens' global research unit Corporate Technology in Erlangen have developed a model that simulates the behavior of battery systems in which hundreds of the new cells are interconnected. This is the case, for example, with compact and large storage systems.

After numerous measurements and simulations, the scientists managed to understand the batteries' behavior and to describe it mathematically. The model not only encompasses the batteries' electrical behavior, but also their mechanical and thermal behavior.

The simulations enabled to scientists to find out how the new batteries' output and energy content are affected when the batteries are used to stabilize power networks or regulate frequencies, for example.

Facilis A team of engineers at Drive Technologies in Chemnitz developed the associated battery management system, which controls the cells' charge level. To ensure a smooth interaction, the engineers used components available from Siemens for the system concept.

For example, a Simotion control system analyzes the cells' voltage and temperature. This enables the software to take on additional tasks, such as when the battery is incorporated into a power grid or a drive network.

The new cells might give a variety of Siemens business areas a competitive edge. A demonstrator has already been created with which engineers can test various possible applications.

The project's participants also included specialists from the specialty chemicals company Clariant, the battery manufacturer Leclanché, and the Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research Baden-Württemberg (ZSW).

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.siemens.com/innovationnews

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews

Further reports about: Energy Lithium batteries battery voltage

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Studying how unconventional metals behave, with an eye on high-temperature superconductors
13.12.2018 | Princeton University

nachricht An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes
13.12.2018 | Rutgers University

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

Im Focus: New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Success at leading conference on silicon materials science and technology in Japan

13.12.2018 | Awards Funding

NSF-supported scientists present new research results on Earth's critical zone

13.12.2018 | Earth Sciences

Barely scratching the surface: A new way to make robust membranes

13.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>