Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fuel cell reaches milestone

03.03.2004


UAF Photo by Carla Browning


A five-kilowatt solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) undergoing testing in Fairbanks has reached the 5,000-hour milestone since its start-up eight months ago. During each hour of operation the fuel cell produces approximately four kilowatts of electricity totaling 20,000 kilowatt hours for the duration, enough to power two average houses for a full year.

"Since the biggest questions surrounding fuel cells have been longevity and reliability, this is an exciting achievement in fuel cell technology and testing," said Dennis Witmer, director of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory which is conducting the tests.

The fuel cell was manufactured by Fuel Cell Technologies in collaboration with Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. Siemens manufactures the core fuel cell stack technology and FCT supplies the critical balance of plant subsystems required to keep the fuel cell stack operating.



"We’re pleased with the performance of this unit and have used this successful field demonstration to build an entire second generation of systems," said Gary Allen, director of sales for FCT. "The overall efficiency of the fuel cell is very encouraging."

Fairbanks Natural Gas has been supplying the unit with natural gas in exchange for the electricity generated from it which they’ve used to power their building in south Fairbanks since last July.

"This has been a valuable test for future potential uses of natural gas," said Dan Britton, president of FNG. "We’re pleased with its overall operation and it has provided an electrical cost savings."

Fuel cells have long been touted as a way to provide reliable, affordable energy to remote areas of Alaska. The SOFC test is among $6 million in projects funded under recent proposals submitted to AETDL for funding by DOE’s Arctic Energy Office.

Carla Browning | University of Alaska Fairbanks
Further information:
http://www.uaf.edu/news
http://www.uaf.edu/news/headlines/20040302093558.html

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht How electric heating could save CO2 emissions
17.12.2018 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power
14.12.2018 | Purdue University

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New megalibrary approach proves useful for the rapid discovery of new materials

Northwestern discovery tool is thousands of times faster than conventional screening methods

Different eras of civilization are defined by the discovery of new materials, as new materials drive new capabilities. And yet, identifying the best material...

Im Focus: Data storage using individual molecules

Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal ‘small’, the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.

Around the world, researchers are attempting to shrink data storage devices to achieve as large a storage capacity in as small a space as possible. In almost...

Im Focus: Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

The more objects we make "smart," from watches to entire buildings, the greater the need for these devices to store and retrieve massive amounts of data quickly without consuming too much power.

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and provide that speed and energy savings, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved...

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists to give artificial intelligence human hearing

19.12.2018 | Information Technology

Newly discovered adolescent star seen undergoing 'growth spurt'

19.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

From a plant sugar to toxic hydrogen sulfide

19.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>