Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Scientists create world’s most efficient light-bulb

27.08.2003


Donegan’s Microcavities: quantum dots emitting light in green and red


Scientists have successfully produced the most efficient light bulb ever – but on the microscopic scale. Researchers at Trinity College, Dublin have discovered a technique which significantly improves the output of light from quantum dots, and also allows their light to be focussed and manipulated easily. Their findings are published today in the Institute of Physics journal Semiconductor Science and Technology.

Dr Yuri Rakovich and Dr John Donegan from Trinity College, Dublin working with researchers at the universities of Hamburg and Munich, have successfully placed quantum dots (the most efficient light-bulb in the world) onto a tiny polymer sphere.

Scientists have known for some time that quantum dots (tiny particles made from certain semiconducting materials) have numerous applications as they are capable of producing light without wasting any energy as heat. They are the basic unit of quantum computers – computers around 10,000 times faster that the fastest computer currently in use. John Donegan’s team have found that they can make quantum dots more efficient than ever. By embedding quantum dots on the surface of a microsphere they can enhance the output of light from these quantum dots by a factor of 20 and - because these structures are spherical - they allow the light emitted from the quantum dots to be focussed into a fine beam which can be moved around easily by the researcher.



The Trinity College team’s work has been carried out entirely under the microscope. They took a polymer microsphere of about 5 microns in diameter (one twentieth the diameter of a human hair) and coated the surface with quantum dots made of cadmium telluride, a semiconductor similar to gallium nitride. Once the surface of the microsphere was fully coated in quantum dots, they observed the surface emitting light in different colours; in this case red and green.

Dr Donegan and his team have been trying to improve the efficiency of light emission from quantum dots so that they can create a beam of light as tightly focussed as possible. These beams have a large number of possible applications and are likely to be applied to all branches of quantum technology in the future (computing, mobile phones, energy production). Dr Donegan’s team are particularly interested in the manipulation of single strands of DNA. They are able to produce beams of light thin enough to be capable of manipulating a single strand of DNA, stretching it and reading the genetic information. Devices which can do this with light have been dubbed “optical tweezers” but Donegan’s group believe they can now create a beam of light much finer than ever before and one which can be manipulated much more easily than previously thought possible.

Dr Donegan said: “We hope that our microcavity will help in all possible applications of quantum dots but especially in our ability to manipulate physically single strands of DNA. It could have major uses in genetic analysis and in gene sequencing where the ability to handle DNA strands with increasing accuracy and dexterity is becoming ever more important”.

| alfa
Further information:
http://stacks.iop.org/SS/18/914

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Nano-scale process may speed arrival of cheaper hi-tech products
09.11.2018 | University of Edinburgh

nachricht Nuclear fusion: wrestling with burning questions on the control of 'burning plasmas'
25.10.2018 | Lehigh University

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

Im Focus: Coping with errors in the quantum age

Physicists at ETH Zurich demonstrate how errors that occur during the manipulation of quantum system can be monitored and corrected on the fly

The field of quantum computation has seen tremendous progress in recent years. Bit by bit, quantum devices start to challenge conventional computers, at least...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Massive impact crater from a kilometer-wide iron meteorite discovered in Greenland

15.11.2018 | Earth Sciences

When electric fields make spins swirl

15.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Discovery of a cool super-Earth

15.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>