Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Piggyback battery for microchips: TU Graz researchers develop new battery concept

17.08.2016

Electrochemists at TU Graz have managed to use monocrystalline semiconductor silicon as an active storage electrode in lithium batteries. This enables an integrated power supply to be made for microchips with a rechargeable battery.

Small electrical gadgets, such as mobile phones, tablets or notebooks, are indispensable accompaniments of everyday life. Integrated circuits in the interiors of these devices monitor, control and regulate the most varied processes.


The micro battery is only a few millimetres big and achieves performances which can compete with today’s best available Li-ion battery systems

© Lunghammer – TU Graz

A ubiquitous trend in microelectronics is towards the smaller, more mobile and more diverse. And this shows how important the research results published in Scientific Reports by the research team led by Michael Sternad and Martin Wilkening from the Christian Doppler Laboratory for Lithium Batteries at TU Graz’s Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Materials are.

The on-board power supply of a microchip could definitely extend the range of applications of microelectronics.

Mini battery for microchips

One result of the many years of basic research at the CD Laboratory for Lithium Batteries at TU Graz shows how monocrystalline silicon, which the microchips consists of, can be used directly as a battery electrode (anode). Thus the microchip not only houses the electronics, but is at the same time an important part of a mini battery providing electrical energy, e.g. for sending and receiving information.

“Normally you cannot use single crystalline silicon as a battery component on its own because it expands considerably when implemented with lithium, starts to crack and is gradually destroyed,” explains Michael Sternad, researcher at the Christian Doppler Laboratory for Lithium Batteries at TU Graz. “We use the doped semiconductor silicon of the chip directly. However, it is first carefully microstructured using a knowledge of the crystal axes and then electrochemically specially activated,” explains Michael Sternad.

Powerful and economical

Besides the enormous storage capacity (more than 1000 mAh/g) and a high power efficiency (Coulomb efficiency >98.8 %) of the silicon electrode, what was especially surprising for the researchers was the fact that the small silicon towers of which the anode of the lithium battery consists withstand more than a 100 full charge and discharge cycles with loss of capacity of only a few per cent.

Thus the electrochemical service life of the micro battery outperforms the average period of use of a sensor or a probe. Martin Wilkening, head of the Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Materials and the CD Lab for Lithium Batteries, is very enthusiastic about this mini power station:

“The micro battery is only a few millimetres big and achieves performances which can compete with today’s best available Li-ion battery systems. Moreover, several thousand cells can be produced in parallel on a semiconductor silicon wafer, so that unit prices of only a few cents would be achievable.”

Christian Doppler Laboratory for Lithium Batteries: ageing effects, technology and new materials

The Christian Doppler Laboratory for Lithium Batteries at the Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Materials at TU Graz was established in 2012 and is committed to developing new concepts for lithium batteries. In addition to Si micro batteries, solid-state Li batteries are also being investigated. The corporate partners of the CD Laboratory are AVL List GmbH and Infineon Technologies Austria AG.

The research results were published in Scientific Reports

Contacts:
Michael STERNAD
Dipl.-Ing. Dr.techn.
TU Graz | Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Materials
CD Laboratory for Lithium Batteries
Mobile: +43 664 463 2727 | Tel.: +43 316 873 32320
michael@sternad.com

Martin WILKENING
Univ.-Prof. Dr.rer.nat.
TU Graz | Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Materials
CD Laboratory for Lithium Batteries
Mobile: +43 664 88796957 | Tel.: +43 316 873 32330
wilkening@tugraz.at

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.nature.com/articles/srep31712
http://www.lithium.tugraz.at/
http://bit.ly/2bxBBOC

Mag. Barbara Gigler | Technische Universität Graz

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht DGIST achieves the highest efficiency of flexible CZTSSe thin-film solar cell
19.09.2019 | DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology)

nachricht Researchers produce synthetic Hall Effect to achieve one-way radio transmission
13.09.2019 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Stevens team closes in on 'holy grail' of room temperature quantum computing chips

Photons interact on chip-based system with unprecedented efficiency

To process information, photons must interact. However, these tiny packets of light want nothing to do with each other, each passing by without altering the...

Im Focus: Happy hour for time-resolved crystallography

Researchers from the Department of Atomically Resolved Dynamics of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg, the University of Hamburg and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) outstation in the city have developed a new method to watch biomolecules at work. This method dramatically simplifies starting enzymatic reactions by mixing a cocktail of small amounts of liquids with protein crystals. Determination of the protein structures at different times after mixing can be assembled into a time-lapse sequence that shows the molecular foundations of biology.

The functions of biomolecules are determined by their motions and structural changes. Yet it is a formidable challenge to understand these dynamic motions.

Im Focus: Modular OLED light strips

At the International Symposium on Automotive Lighting 2019 (ISAL) in Darmstadt from September 23 to 25, 2019, the Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, a provider of research and development services in the field of organic electronics, will present OLED light strips of any length with additional functionalities for the first time at booth no. 37.

Almost everyone is familiar with light strips for interior design. LED strips are available by the metre in DIY stores around the corner and are just as often...

Im Focus: Tomorrow´s coolants of choice

Scientists assess the potential of magnetic-cooling materials

Later during this century, around 2060, a paradigm shift in global energy consumption is expected: we will spend more energy for cooling than for heating....

Im Focus: The working of a molecular string phone

Researchers from the Department of Atomically Resolved Dynamics of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg, the University of Potsdam (both in Germany) and the University of Toronto (Canada) have pieced together a detailed time-lapse movie revealing all the major steps during the catalytic cycle of an enzyme. Surprisingly, the communication between the protein units is accomplished via a water-network akin to a string telephone. This communication is aligned with a ‘breathing’ motion, that is the expansion and contraction of the protein.

This time-lapse sequence of structures reveals dynamic motions as a fundamental element in the molecular foundations of biology.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Technologies: International Symposium „Future Optics“ in Hannover

19.09.2019 | Event News

Society 5.0: putting humans at the heart of digitalisation

10.09.2019 | Event News

Interspeech 2019 conference: Alexa and Siri in Graz

04.09.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

DGIST achieves the highest efficiency of flexible CZTSSe thin-film solar cell

19.09.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering

NTU Singapore scientists develop technique to observe radiation damage over femtoseconds

19.09.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Optical Technologies: International Symposium „Future Optics“ in Hannover

19.09.2019 | Event News

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>