Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New UC Riverside research advances spintronics technology

02.02.2018

Discoveries will help realize the promise of faster, energy-efficient spintronic computers and ultra-high-capacity data storage

Engineers at the University of California, Riverside, have reported advances in so-called "spintronic" devices that will help lead to a new technology for computing and data storage.


UCR researchers have developed methods to detect signals from spintronic components made of low-cost metals and silicon.

Credit: UC Riverside

They have developed methods to detect signals from spintronic components made of low-cost metals and silicon, which overcomes a major barrier to wide application of spintronics. Previously such devices depended on complex structures that used rare and expensive metals such as platinum. The researchers were led by Sandeep Kumar, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering.

Spintronic devices promise to solve major problems in today's electronic computers, in that the computers use massive amounts of electricity and generate heat that requires expending even more energy for cooling.

By contrast, spintronic devices generate little heat and use relatively minuscule amounts of electricity. Spintronic computers would require no energy to maintain data in memory. They would also start instantly and have the potential to be far more powerful than today's computers.

While electronics depends on the charge of electrons to generate the binary ones or zeroes of computer data, spintronics depends on the property of electrons called spin. Spintronic materials register binary data via the "up" or "down" spin orientation of electrons--like the north and south of bar magnets--in the materials. A major barrier to development of spintronics devices is generating and detecting the infinitesimal electric spin signals in spintronic materials.

In one paper published in the January issue of the scientific journal Applied Physics Letters, Kumar and colleagues reported an efficient technique of detecting the spin currents in a simple two-layer sandwich of silicon and a nickel-iron alloy called Permalloy.

All three of the components are both inexpensive and abundant and could provide the basis for commercial spintronic devices. They also operate at room temperature. The layers were created with the widely used electronics manufacturing processes called sputtering. Co-authors of the paper were graduate students Ravindra Bhardwaj and Paul Lou.

In their experiments, the researchers heated one side of the Permalloy-silicon bi-layer sandwich to create a temperature gradient, which generated an electrical voltage in the bi-layer. The voltage was due to phenomenon known as the spin-Seebeck effect. The engineers found that they could detect the resulting "spin current" in the bi-layer due to another phenomenon known as the "inverse spin-Hall effect."

The researchers said their findings will have application to efficient magnetic switching in computer memories, and "these scientific breakthroughs may give impetus" to development of such devices. More broadly, they concluded, "These results bring the ubiquitous Si (silicon) to forefront of spintronics research and will lay the foundation of energy efficient Si spintronics and Si spin caloritronics devices."

In two other scientific papers, the researchers demonstrated that they could generate a key property for spintronics materials, called antiferromagnetism, in silicon. The achievement opens an important pathway to commercial spintronics, said the researchers, given that silicon is inexpensive and can be manufactured using a mature technology with a long history of application in electronics.

Ferromagnetism is the property of magnetic materials in which the magnetic poles of the atoms are aligned in the same direction. In contrast, antiferromagnetism is a property in which the neighboring atoms are magnetically oriented in opposite directions. These "magnetic moments" are due to the spin of electrons in the atoms, and is central to the application of the materials in spintronics.

In the two papers, Kumar and Lou reported detecting antiferromagnetism in the two types of silicon--called n-type and p-type--used in transistors and other electronic components. N-type semiconductor silicon is "doped" with substances that cause it to have an abundance of negatively-charged electrons; and p-type silicon is doped to have a large concentration of positively charged "holes." Combining the two types enables switching of current in such devices as transistors used in computer memories and other electronics.

In the paper in the Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, Lou and Kumar reported detecting the spin-Hall effect and antiferromagnetism in n-silicon. Their experiments used a multilayer thin film comprising palladium, nickel-iron Permalloy, manganese oxide and n-silicon.

And in the second paper, in the scientific journal physica status solidi, they reported detecting in p-silicon spin-driven antiferromagnetism and a transition of silicon between metal and insulator properties. Those experiments used a thin film similar to those with the n-silicon.

The researchers wrote in the latter paper that "The observed emergent antiferromagnetic behavior may lay the foundation of Si (silicon) spintronics and may change every field involving Si thin films. These experiments also present potential electric control of magnetic behavior using simple semiconductor electronics physics. The observed large change in resistance and doping dependence of phase transformation encourages the development of antiferromagnetic and phase change spintronics devices."

In further studies, Kumar and his colleagues are developing technology to switch spin currents on and off in the materials, with the ultimate goal of creating a spin transistor. They are also working to generate larger, higher-voltage spintronic chips. The result of their work could be extremely low-power, compact transmitters and sensors, as well as energy-efficient data storage and computer memories, said Kumar.

###

The titles of the papers are:

Spin Seebeck effect and thermal spin galvanic effect in Ni80Fe20/p-Si bilayers

Spin-Hall effect and emergent antiferromagnetic phase transition in n-Si

Spin-Driven Emergent Antiferromagnetism and Metal-Insulator Transition in Nanoscale p-Si

Media Contact

Sarah Nightingale
sarah.nightingale@ucr.edu
951-827-4580

 @UCRiverside

http://www.ucr.edu 

Sarah Nightingale | EurekAlert!

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Fraunhofer starts development of refrigerant-free, energy-efficient electrocaloric heat pumps
09.12.2019 | Fraunhofer IPM

nachricht A solution for cleaning up PFAS, one of the world's most intractable pollutants
06.12.2019 | Colorado State University

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Highly charged ion paves the way towards new physics

In a joint experimental and theoretical work performed at the Heidelberg Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, an international team of physicists detected for the first time an orbital crossing in the highly charged ion Pr⁹⁺. Optical spectra were recorded employing an electron beam ion trap and analysed with the aid of atomic structure calculations. A proposed nHz-wide transition has been identified and its energy was determined with high precision. Theory predicts a very high sensitivity to new physics and extremely low susceptibility to external perturbations for this “clock line” making it a unique candidate for proposed precision studies.

Laser spectroscopy of neutral atoms and singly charged ions has reached astonishing precision by merit of a chain of technological advances during the past...

Im Focus: Ultrafast stimulated emission microscopy of single nanocrystals in Science

The ability to investigate the dynamics of single particle at the nano-scale and femtosecond level remained an unfathomed dream for years. It was not until the dawn of the 21st century that nanotechnology and femtoscience gradually merged together and the first ultrafast microscopy of individual quantum dots (QDs) and molecules was accomplished.

Ultrafast microscopy studies entirely rely on detecting nanoparticles or single molecules with luminescence techniques, which require efficient emitters to...

Im Focus: How to induce magnetism in graphene

Graphene, a two-dimensional structure made of carbon, is a material with excellent mechanical, electronic and optical properties. However, it did not seem suitable for magnetic applications. Together with international partners, Empa researchers have now succeeded in synthesizing a unique nanographene predicted in the 1970s, which conclusively demonstrates that carbon in very specific forms has magnetic properties that could permit future spintronic applications. The results have just been published in the renowned journal Nature Nanotechnology.

Depending on the shape and orientation of their edges, graphene nanostructures (also known as nanographenes) can have very different properties – for example,...

Im Focus: Electronic map reveals 'rules of the road' in superconductor

Band structure map exposes iron selenide's enigmatic electronic signature

Using a clever technique that causes unruly crystals of iron selenide to snap into alignment, Rice University physicists have drawn a detailed map that reveals...

Im Focus: Developing a digital twin

University of Texas and MIT researchers create virtual UAVs that can predict vehicle health, enable autonomous decision-making

In the not too distant future, we can expect to see our skies filled with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) delivering packages, maybe even people, from location...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

The Future of Work

03.12.2019 | Event News

First International Conference on Agrophotovoltaics in August 2020

15.11.2019 | Event News

Laser Symposium on Electromobility in Aachen: trends for the mobility revolution

15.11.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Self-driving microrobots

11.12.2019 | Materials Sciences

Innovation boost for “learning factory”: European research project “SemI40” generates path-breaking findings

11.12.2019 | Information Technology

Molecular milk mayonnaise: How mouthfeel and microscopic properties are related in mayonnaise

11.12.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>