Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Ceramic Transformer Integrates Power Supply Unit

17.06.2013
Siemens scientists have developed new kinds of ceramics in which they can embed transformers.

The new development allows power supply transformers to be reduced to one fifth of their current size so that the normally separate switched-mode power supply units of light-emitting diodes can be integrated into the module's heat sink.



The new technology was developed in cooperation with industrial and research partners who worked together on a joint project for the activation of LEDs by means of LTCC-ferrite modules (ALFerMo).

Components for the control and automation of industrial equipment, building technology, traffic systems, and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) require driver circuits so that they can be activated and supplied with electricity. In many cases, the size of these modules makes it impossible for the systems to have a light and simple structure. If the circuits could be made smaller, they could be embedded in the device. However, transformers pose an obstacle to miniaturization due to their magnetic ferrite core and metallic windings. As a result, transformer size is frequently the factor that determines a module's size.

Using a very bright arrangement of 16 Osram OSLON light-emitting diodes as an example, the ALFerMo consortium has demonstrated how a switched-mode power supply unit can be installed in cavities in the heat sink. Experts at Siemens' global Corporate Technology unit used two techniques to miniaturize the transformer. First, they quadrupled the switching frequency, because the higher the switching frequency, the smaller the transformer can be.

The researchers also developed a layered system of magnetic ceramic films. This allows the ferrite core and the windings to be easily incorporated into a ceramic circuit board. This enabled the transformer to be reduced to one fifth of its original size so that the driver circuit could be installed into an LED heat sink that is ten centimeters wide and five centimeters high. As a result, the LED module no longer requires a separate power supply unit even though it is still as bright as before.

The ALFerMo project expanded the range of possibilities for integrating circuit boards into the compact, modular power electronics assemblies of the future. Smart control systems of this type will make buildings, energy plants, and manufacturing facilities more competitive.

The researchers are now investigating the possibility of applying this technique in the most widespread types of epoxy circuit boards as well as in non-lighting systems. The ALFerMo project is part of the German Research Ministry's Power Electronics for Energy Efficiency Enhancement (LES) program. As part of its high-technology strategy, the German government provided the project with funding amounting to €2.65 million until the end of May 2013.

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/innovationnews

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Patented nanostructure for solar cells: Rough optics, smooth surface
18.09.2018 | Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH

nachricht With Gallium Nitride for a Powerful 5G Cellular Network - EU project “5G GaN2” started
17.09.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Festkörperphysik IAF

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists present new observations to understand the phase transition in quantum chromodynamics

The building blocks of matter in our universe were formed in the first 10 microseconds of its existence, according to the currently accepted scientific picture. After the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago, matter consisted mainly of quarks and gluons, two types of elementary particles whose interactions are governed by quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of strong interaction. In the early universe, these particles moved (nearly) freely in a quark-gluon plasma.

This is a joint press release of University Muenster and Heidelberg as well as the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt.

Then, in a phase transition, they combined and formed hadrons, among them the building blocks of atomic nuclei, protons and neutrons. In the current issue of...

Im Focus: Patented nanostructure for solar cells: Rough optics, smooth surface

Thin-film solar cells made of crystalline silicon are inexpensive and achieve efficiencies of a good 14 percent. However, they could do even better if their shiny surfaces reflected less light. A team led by Prof. Christiane Becker from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has now patented a sophisticated new solution to this problem.

"It is not enough simply to bring more light into the cell," says Christiane Becker. Such surface structures can even ultimately reduce the efficiency by...

Im Focus: New soft coral species discovered in Panama

A study in the journal Bulletin of Marine Science describes a new, blood-red species of octocoral found in Panama. The species in the genus Thesea was discovered in the threatened low-light reef environment on Hannibal Bank, 60 kilometers off mainland Pacific Panama, by researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama (STRI) and the Centro de Investigación en Ciencias del Mar y Limnología (CIMAR) at the University of Costa Rica.

Scientists established the new species, Thesea dalioi, by comparing its physical traits, such as branch thickness and the bright red colony color, with the...

Im Focus: New devices based on rust could reduce excess heat in computers

Physicists explore long-distance information transmission in antiferromagnetic iron oxide

Scientists have succeeded in observing the first long-distance transfer of information in a magnetic group of materials known as antiferromagnets.

Im Focus: Finding Nemo's genes

An international team of researchers has mapped Nemo's genome

An international team of researchers has mapped Nemo's genome, providing the research community with an invaluable resource to decode the response of fish to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

One of the world’s most prominent strategic forums for global health held in Berlin in October 2018

03.09.2018 | Event News

4th Intelligent Materials - European Symposium on Intelligent Materials

27.08.2018 | Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Glacial engineering could limit sea-level rise, if we get our emissions under control

20.09.2018 | Earth Sciences

Warning against hubris in CO2 removal

20.09.2018 | Earth Sciences

Halfway mark for NOEMA, the super-telescope under construction

20.09.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>