Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A major research effort into tomorrow's digital power grids

20.09.2016

How will a future electricity grid manage the demands of induction cooking, charging electric cars and roof-installed solar panels? The answer is Smart Grids, which involves digitisation of the electricity grid. 

The aim of a new research centre called CINELDI (Centre for INtelligent ELectricity DIistribution - to empower the future Smart Grid) is to develop systems as part of tomorrow's adaptable, robust and intelligent energy system.


Gerd Kjølle and Kjell Sand giving a presentation to visiting European journalists in the Smart Grid laboratory in June 2016. Photo: Gry Karin Stimo/SINTEF

The centre is headed by SINTEF Energy Research and will operate for between five and eight years with a budget of about NOK 360 million. The centre will be opened on Wednesday 21 September together with the new NTNU/SINTEF SmartGrid Lab.

Saving money and protecting the environment

"Smart Grids provide output and energy efficiency, and make it easier to exploit renewable energy sources. They can also help towards removing the need to expand existing grid capacity – something which would be unavoidable if Smart Grids hadn't entered the stage", says SINTEF's Gerd Kjølle, who will be heading the CINELDI centre.

Major demands are placed on the electricity grid when we cook our meals on induction hobs and charge up our electric cars at the same time. But Smart Grids enable us, for example, to give the grid operator permission to disconnect consumption linked to water heating, thus avoiding the need to expand grid capacity.

No organisation can introduce Smart Grids alone

The CINELDI research centre is headed by SINTEF Energy Research in close collaboration with NTNU. It also has many research partners in Europe, Japan and the USA.

"No organisation can introduce Smart Grids alone", says Kjølle. "This is why we're involving partners from among the grid companies, system operators, technology manufacturers, member organisations and the pubic authorities", she says.

The new Smart Grid laboratory will enable researchers to simulate real situations arising in power systems of all sizes in a way that has not been possible before.

"We can test new systems developed by technology manufacturers, research projects or students by subjecting them to all magnitudes of interruptions, noise, communication delays and so on", says Kjell Sand, who is Project Manager for the Norwegian Smart Grid laboratory from Norwegian University of Science and Technology, and a member of the CINELDI management team. "Testing will provide us with assurances that the systems can handle situations that they will be exposed to as part of a future smart power system", he says.

Facts: The Centres for Environmentally-Friendly Energy Research (FMEs) represent a focused and long-term research effort in the fields of renewable energy, energy efficiency, CO2 management and the social sciences. SINTEF is heading three of the new FMEs: CINELDI, HighEFF and NCCS. SINTEF is also a participant in five other new FMEs.

http://www.sintef.no/en/projects/cineldi/

Anne Steenstrup-Duch | AlphaGalileo

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Robot arms with the flexibility of an elephant’s trunk
18.03.2019 | Universität des Saarlandes

nachricht Saarbrücken research team uses artificial muscles to develop an air conditioner for the future
12.03.2019 | Universität des Saarlandes

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Revealing the secret of the vacuum for the first time

New research group at the University of Jena combines theory and experiment to demonstrate for the first time certain physical processes in a quantum vacuum

For most people, a vacuum is an empty space. Quantum physics, on the other hand, assumes that even in this lowest-energy state, particles and antiparticles...

Im Focus: Sussex scientists one step closer to a clock that could replace GPS and Galileo

Physicists in the EPic Lab at University of Sussex make crucial development in global race to develop a portable atomic clock

Scientists in the Emergent Photonics Lab (EPic Lab) at the University of Sussex have made a breakthrough to a crucial element of an atomic clock - devices...

Im Focus: Sensing shakes

A new way to sense earthquakes could help improve early warning systems

Every year earthquakes worldwide claim hundreds or even thousands of lives. Forewarning allows people to head for safety and a matter of seconds could spell...

Im Focus: A thermo-sensor for magnetic bits

New concept for energy-efficient data processing technology

Scientists of the Department of Physics at the University of Hamburg, Germany, detected the magnetic states of atoms on a surface using only heat. The...

Im Focus: The moiré patterns of three layers change the electronic properties of graphene

Combining an atomically thin graphene and a boron nitride layer at a slightly rotated angle changes their electrical properties. Physicists at the University of Basel have now shown for the first time the combination with a third layer can result in new material properties also in a three-layer sandwich of carbon and boron nitride. This significantly increases the number of potential synthetic materials, report the researchers in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Last year, researchers in the US caused a big stir when they showed that rotating two stacked graphene layers by a “magical” angle of 1.1 degrees turns...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Modelica Conference with 330 visitors from 21 countries at OTH Regensburg

11.03.2019 | Event News

Selection Completed: 580 Young Scientists from 88 Countries at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

01.03.2019 | Event News

LightMAT 2019 – 3rd International Conference on Light Materials – Science and Technology

28.02.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

How heavy elements come about in the universe

18.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Robot arms with the flexibility of an elephant’s trunk

18.03.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Microbes can grow on nitric oxide (NO)

18.03.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>