Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

What makes an employee successful abroad

05.12.2007
If an employer wants to send an employee to work at a foreign branch, how does he select the best candidate?

In his dissertation entitled 'Crossing borders with personnel selection, from expatriates to multicultural teams' psychologist Stefan Mol examines which selection methods offer the greatest chance of success. Research often focuses too much attention on the candidate’s level of adaptability, whereas it is wiser to look at potential work performance. Mol will take his PhD at Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands, on Thursday, 6 December 2007.

Stefan Mol looked at how the selection of personnel can be improved at a workplace where expatriates from various nationalities have to work together. Most psychological studies into the issue place great emphasis on forecasting the candidate’s ability to adapt to the culture of the host country. Mol discovered that this ability says little about the employee’s ultimate performance. It is wiser to look at personality traits that could predict work performance, according to Mol.

Mol examined a large number of character traits to ascertain whether they are linked to the work performance of expatriates. From this it emerged that the so-called Big Five are the best predictors: extroversion, emotional stability, conscientiousness (a combination of meticulousness and trustworthiness) and friendliness. Openness turned out not to be a predictor of an expatriate’s work performance. These conclusions largely support the findings of studies conducted among non-expatriate employees.

The Big Five personality traits are however less effective in predicting the willingness to be deployed abroad. In that case it is recommended to look at the candidate’s specific international experience in the past, such as travel experience or having a multicultural circle of friends.

Mol also conducted part of his research in South Africa, where he attempted to predict the training performance of aspiring police officers. It emerged that in this environment the prevalent culture plays an important role in the assessment of performance at the workplace. The reported differences in performance were attributed more to the evaluator than the candidates. Mol ascribed this finding to the collectivist culture that prevails in South Africa.

Stefan Mol’s research was co-funded by GITP International.

Yvette Nelen | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eur.nl/english

More articles from Business and Finance:

nachricht Microtechnology industry is hiring – positive developments of past years continue
09.04.2018 | IVAM Fachverband für Mikrotechnik

nachricht RWI/ISL-Container Throughput Index with minor decline on a high overall level
20.03.2018 | RWI – Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung

All articles from Business and Finance >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Stellar cartography

The Potsdam Echelle Polarimetric and Spectroscopic Instrument (PEPSI) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona released its first image of the surface magnetic field of another star. In a paper in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, the PEPSI team presents a Zeeman- Doppler-Image of the surface of the magnetically active star II Pegasi.

A special technique allows astronomers to resolve the surfaces of faraway stars. Those are otherwise only seen as point sources, even in the largest telescopes...

Im Focus: Heading towards a tsunami of light

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have proposed a way to create a completely new source of radiation. Ultra-intense light pulses consist of the motion of a single wave and can be described as a tsunami of light. The strong wave can be used to study interactions between matter and light in a unique way. Their research is now published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

"This source of radiation lets us look at reality through a new angle - it is like twisting a mirror and discovering something completely different," says...

Im Focus: Revealing the secret of the vacuum for the first time

New research group at the University of Jena combines theory and experiment to demonstrate for the first time certain physical processes in a quantum vacuum

For most people, a vacuum is an empty space. Quantum physics, on the other hand, assumes that even in this lowest-energy state, particles and antiparticles...

Im Focus: Sussex scientists one step closer to a clock that could replace GPS and Galileo

Physicists in the EPic Lab at University of Sussex make crucial development in global race to develop a portable atomic clock

Scientists in the Emergent Photonics Lab (EPic Lab) at the University of Sussex have made a breakthrough to a crucial element of an atomic clock - devices...

Im Focus: Sensing shakes

A new way to sense earthquakes could help improve early warning systems

Every year earthquakes worldwide claim hundreds or even thousands of lives. Forewarning allows people to head for safety and a matter of seconds could spell...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Modelica Conference with 330 visitors from 21 countries at OTH Regensburg

11.03.2019 | Event News

Selection Completed: 580 Young Scientists from 88 Countries at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

01.03.2019 | Event News

LightMAT 2019 – 3rd International Conference on Light Materials – Science and Technology

28.02.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Levitating objects with light

19.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

New technique for in-cell distance determination

19.03.2019 | Life Sciences

Stellar cartography

19.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>