Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Strong Earthquake in Chile and Tsunami

17.09.2015

Chilean Tsunami Early Warning System

The very strong earthquake with a magnitude of 8.2 which occurred on the evening of 16.9.2015 (local time) hit a part of the Chilean coastline that was last shook by an earthquake of almost the same magnitude on 6.4.1943.


Tsunami simulation off the Chile Coast, for the earthquake on 16 September 2015, Pacific View (A. Babeyko, GFZ).

Information on casualties and damage is still incomplete. It appears, however, that the quake has been comparatively harmless, mainly, among other factors, because the warning based on scientific research was taken seriously.

The Nazca Plate, a part of the Pacific Earth crust moves along the South American crust at a rate of approx. 6.8 centimeters per year pushing under the continent in the process. The repeated interlocking and breaking apart on the boundary surface between both plates has been controlling this procedure over several 100 million years.

Only in 2010, a little further south of the current rupture and just before the second largest Chilean city of Concepcion, an earthquake occurred, which with a magnitude of 8.8, was one of the five strongest earthquakes that was recorded since the start of seismological monitoring.

Following this event, in which 500 people lost their lives – mainly due to the resulting tsunami – the Chilean State began to set up a nationwide network of seismological and GPS stations. The godfather of this activity was the Earthquake Observatory IPOC in North Chile (ipoc-network.org) which had been previously jointly developed by the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in cooperation with French partners.

“The aim of IPOC was to test new observation technologies and to carry out research on earthquakes and volcanos”, explains Professor Onno Oncken of the GFZ. “The observation and measuring stations developed here served as the blueprint for a network that meanwhile, with a total length of about 4000 kilometers, virtually covers the whole Chilean coastline.”

This observation system which is operated by a state organization founded especially for this purpose has now, for the first time, been able to prove its performance capability. Yesterday’s earthquake triggered a tsunami; however, a warning had already been very quickly and successfully issued.

The expected waves reaching three to four metres above sea level were observed at numerous coastal stations, parts of Coquimbo, the largest city in this section of the coast north of Valparaiso, are flooded. The actual number of casualties is not yet known so soon after such an event, however, we can assume that the Chilean Early Warning System has successfully functioned.

Graphic sketch of the tsunami propagation model in the eastern Pacific is here:
http://www.gfz-potsdam.de/en/media-communication/mediathek/image-galleries/earth...
Picture and information of the location and magnitude of the main shock: http://geofon.gfz-potsdam.de/eqinfo/event.php?id=gfz2015sfdd
Aftershock activity: http://geofon.gfz-potsdam.de/eqinfo/list.php
How to behave in case of strong quakes and tsunami? http://www.gfz-potsdam.de/en/media-communication/current-earthquake-information/

Franz Ossing | Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam - Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum GFZ

Further reports about: Chile GFZ GPs Helmholtz-Zentrum Strong Tsunami earthquake propagation scientific research sea level

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Scientists discover Earth's youngest banded iron formation in western China
12.07.2018 | University of Alberta

nachricht Drones survey African wildlife
11.07.2018 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Research finds new molecular structures in boron-based nanoclusters

13.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

Algae Have Land Genes

13.07.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>