Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Scientists find pre-earthquake activity in central Alaska

06.06.2018

Earth scientists consistently look for a reliable way to forecast earthquakes. New research from University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute professor Carl Tape may help in that endeavor, due to a unique set of circumstances.

"Our observations have recorded an unequivocally interesting sequence of events," Tape said.

Tape and his colleagues found evidence for accelerating activity before a 2016 earthquake in a laterally moving fault zone in central Alaska. The activity included a phenomenon known as very low-frequency earthquakes, referring to the type of energy waves associated with it.


Lakes in the roadless Minto Flats surround the Tanana River in this photo from July 2014. The ridge on the horizon leads down to the town of Nenana, Alaska. Seismic stations placed in this unique region detected some intriguing pre-earthquake activity.

Credit: UAF Photo by Carl Tape


University of Alaska Fairbanks doctoral student Kyle Smith installs a T120 posthole seismometer at a site in the Minto Flats of central Alaska in September 2015.

Credit: UAF photo by Carl Tape

Typical earthquakes have two associated energy waves, called the P and S waves. Very low-frequency earthquakes do not have such signals. Instead, their waves occur on much lower frequencies.

"Most earthquakes start abruptly, but not always," said Luciana Astiz, a program director in the National Science Foundation's Division of Earth Sciences, which supported the research. "A fault zone in central Alaska monitored by new scientific instruments offers a look at a more complex process.

This study reports the first observations of a slow process that transitions into an earthquake -- something previously observed only in laboratory experiments. These new observations contribute toward understanding the physics of earthquakes."

In 2015, Tape installed 13 seismic stations in the Minto Flats of central Alaska to capture the area's fault activity. Nine days later, the instruments recorded a long-duration, very low-frequency process, normally only seen in deep subduction zones. This event showed a small amount of activity gathering, or nucleating, in a central area below the surface. It did not lead to an earthquake.

A second, similar event in 2016 led to a key observation. At Minto Flats, a magnitude 3.7 quake occurred at a depth of about 10.5 miles, not an unusual event in itself. However, the event was preceded by a 12-hour accelerating sequence of earthquakes and 22 seconds of distinct high- and low-frequency waves in a concentrated area.

Tape said that this kind of slow event transitioning into a rupture had previously only been seen in laboratory experiments.

"The rupture process started, then it found a patch of the fault that was ready to go, and that's what people have not seen. It's really exciting," Tape said.

"The leap we make, and maybe the more controversial thing, is that this emergent long-period signal only seen on top of the fault is a low-frequency signal that can sometimes turn into an earthquake and sometimes not," Tape said.

Tape and his colleagues may have seen this kind of activity before. In 2012, there was a similar small event recorded in central Alaska. At that time, a magnitude 8.6 earthquake took place under the Indian Ocean and its energy was felt around the world. Because of the magnitude of this event, the smaller activity from central Alaska was overshadowed. Whatever signal the Minto Flats site gave off could not be confirmed. However, it was intriguing enough to help justify putting sensors in the area.

"Never in my wildest dreams did I expect we'd see something like that again," Tape said. "I assumed that the conditions that happened in 2012 were somehow unique and that huge surface waves led to this nucleation. Even though I proposed putting instruments on the area in a proposal, it was the last item I put on. I thought, "Maybe we'll see something crazy out there.'"

By 2016, Tape had high-quality stations on top of the Minto Flat faults, around 18 miles from the main events, and no triggering earthquake to complicate the data.

"We are staring right at this process, and what it showed was that exactly during the tremor-like signal there is this emergent long-duration signal that hints at what's driving this nucleation phase," he said.

Geologists have been looking for something like this for a long time. So why hasn't anyone seen it?

"I'm left saying 'I don't know,'" Tape said. "I'm going to assume everyone has been looking for something before the P wave forever. It leads me to believe there is something special about this fault zone."

Minto Flats has a deep sedimentary basin, strike-slip faulting, active tectonics and deep earthquakes; it is an unusual site.

"In some ways, I wish there wasn't anything special. I wish it was a global phenomenon that we discovered, but it's not," Tape said. "It appears there is something special about the conditions in Minto Flats."

The results of the research will appear in the latest issue of the journal Nature Geoscience. The paper is titled "Earthquake Nucleation and Fault Slip Complexity in the Lower Crust of Central Alaska."

The project was primarily funded by a National Science Foundation CAREER project that supported Tape and his student co-authors, Vipul Silwal and Kyle Smith.

Media Contact

Fritz Freudenberger
ffreudenberger@alaska.edu
907-474-7185

 @uafairbanks

http://www.uaf.edu 

Fritz Freudenberger | EurekAlert!
Further information:
https://news.uaf.edu/scientists-find-pre-earthquake-activity-in-central-alaska/
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41561-018-0144-2

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Neutron source enables a look inside dino eggs
22.01.2020 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht Ozone-depleting substances caused half of late 20th-century Arctic warming, says study
21.01.2020 | Earth Institute at Columbia University

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Integrate Micro Chips for electronic Skin

Researchers from Dresden and Osaka present the first fully integrated flexible electronics made of magnetic sensors and organic circuits which opens the path towards the development of electronic skin.

Human skin is a fascinating and multifunctional organ with unique properties originating from its flexible and compliant nature. It allows for interfacing with...

Im Focus: Dresden researchers discover resistance mechanism in aggressive cancer

Protease blocks guardian function against uncontrolled cell division

Researchers of the Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital Dresden at the National Center for Tumor Diseases Dresden (NCT/UCC), together with an international...

Im Focus: New roles found for Huntington's disease protein

Crucial role in synapse formation could be new avenue toward treatment

A Duke University research team has identified a new function of a gene called huntingtin, a mutation of which underlies the progressive neurodegenerative...

Im Focus: A new look at 'strange metals'

For years, a new synthesis method has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna) to unlock the secrets of "strange metals". Now a breakthrough has been achieved. The results have been published in "Science".

Superconductors allow electrical current to flow without any resistance - but only below a certain critical temperature. Many materials have to be cooled down...

Im Focus: Programmable nests for cells

KIT researchers develop novel composites of DNA, silica particles, and carbon nanotubes -- Properties can be tailored to various applications

Using DNA, smallest silica particles, and carbon nanotubes, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) developed novel programmable materials....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

11th Advanced Battery Power Conference, March 24-25, 2020 in Münster/Germany

16.01.2020 | Event News

Laser Colloquium Hydrogen LKH2: fast and reliable fuel cell manufacturing

15.01.2020 | Event News

„Advanced Battery Power“- Conference, Contributions are welcome!

07.01.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers discover vaccine to strengthen the immune system of plants

24.01.2020 | Life Sciences

Brain-cell helpers powered by norepinephrine during fear-memory formation

24.01.2020 | Life Sciences

Engineered capillaries model traffic in tiny blood vessels

24.01.2020 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>