Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Symposium Examines the Growing Influence of Aerosols on Climate

16.02.2004


In a few decades, it’s likely that scientists will look back at the early part of the 21st century and regard it as a fundamental stage in understanding the importance of the effects of aerosols on Earth’s climate. In fact, it was in this time period, they may say, that aerosols were first found to be as climatologically significant as greenhouse gases.



Aerosols, tiny atmospheric particles made up of various elements and produced by a range of sources, have become a prominent concern due to their ability to influence atmospheric and hydrological phenomena and their important impact on localized regions.

Several of the world’s leading atmospheric and climate scientists will present recent research on aerosols from a selection of scientific angles on Feb. 14 at 2:30 p.m. at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Seattle.


"It has become clear that local effects on the heat budget from aerosols can be substantially larger than those from greenhouse gases. I believe we are at a very early stage of understanding the effect of aerosols," said Richard Somerville, a professor of meteorology at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, and the organizer of the AAAS aerosols symposium, titled "Our Hazy Atmosphere: Aerosols and Climate."

"Aerosols come from all kinds of sources: dust blown off the Sahara by wind, particles emitted from smokestacks, gas from volcanoes. There are many, many complicated interactions with aerosols that we are just beginning to learn about."

Because of their varied compositions, aerosols exert a complicated range of effects. Carbon dioxide primarily absorbs infrared energy emitted by the Earth, thus contributing to the greenhouse effect and warming the Earth’s surface and the atmosphere. Aerosols, on the other hand, can either absorb sunlight, and thus produce a warming effect, or they can reflect or scatter sunlight and produce cooling effects. They can change the heat balance of the surface of the ocean, altering water evaporation processes and leading to a cascade of complex effects and indirect consequences, all of which scientists are now studying.

Somerville says the lifespan of aerosols is typically weeks rather than decades. That characteristic leads to significant impacts in specific regions, in contrast to the long life of some greenhouse gases and their resulting long-term global influences. In addition to climate and atmospheric science, aerosols and their effects are garnering the attention of those concerned with issues of regional pollution, transborder environmental policies, and human health concerns.

"Our Hazy Atmosphere: Aerosols and Climate" offers a sampling of the latest research on aerosols, including atmospheric brown clouds, new aircraft technologies for capturing aerosol particles, global climate impacts and the effects of black carbon on regional climate change.

Mario Aguilera | Scripps News
Further information:
http://scrippsnews.ucsd.edu/article_detail.cfm?article_num=620

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Wintertime Arctic sea ice growth slows long-term decline: NASA
07.12.2018 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht Why Tehran Is Sinking Dangerously
06.12.2018 | Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam - Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum GFZ

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

Im Focus: The force of the vacuum

Scientists from the Theory Department of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg have shown through theoretical calculations and computer simulations that the force between electrons and lattice distortions in an atomically thin two-dimensional superconductor can be controlled with virtual photons. This could aid the development of new superconductors for energy-saving devices and many other technical applications.

The vacuum is not empty. It may sound like magic to laypeople but it has occupied physicists since the birth of quantum mechanics.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Proteins imaged in graphene liquid cell have higher radiation tolerance

10.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

A new molecular player involved in T cell activation

07.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>