Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Coastal Cities Turn Up the Heat on Rainfall

28.05.2003

The old song, asking rain to "go away" and "come again another day," may get even older for people who live in large coastal cities, according to new NASA-funded research.

According to the study, urban heat islands, created from pavement and buildings in big coastal cities like Houston, cause warm air to rise and interact with sea breezes to create heavier and more frequent rainfall in and downwind of the cities. Analysis of Houston-area rain-gauge data, both prior to and since urbanization, also suggests there have been observed increases in rainfall as more heat islands were created.

The Houston-area study used data from the world’s only space-based rain radar on NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, and dense clusters of rain gauges.

Authors, J. Marshall Shepherd of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., and Steve Burian, a University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark. researcher, believe the impact large coastal cities have on weather, and possibly climate, will become increasingly important as more people move into urban areas, with even greater concentrations in coastal zones. The paper is in the current American Meteorological Society and American Geophysical Union’s journal, Earth Interactions.

A recent United Nations report estimates 60 percent of Earth’s population will live in cities by 2025. Previous related studies have shown urban heat islands create heavier rainfall in and downwind of cities like Atlanta, St. Louis and Chicago. However, this is one of the first studies to provide evidence of such an effect around a U.S. coastal city. It is also the first to incorporate specific satellite-derived rainfall data for a coastal urban area.

Urban areas with high concentrations of buildings, roads and other artificial surfaces retain heat, which leads to warmer surrounding temperatures and creates heat islands. Rising warm air, promoted by the increased heat, may help produce clouds that result in more rainfall around cities. Buildings of different heights cause winds to converge, driving them upward, helping form clouds. The study shows the urban heat island/rain effect may be even more pronounced near coasts. In coastal cities like Houston, sea breezes also create rising air and clouds. The combination of urban converging winds and coastal sea breezes may enhance thunderstorm development.

"Recent publications have shown evidence of increased lightning activity over and downwind of Houston," Shepherd said. "Since lightning and rainfall are so closely related, we decided to use TRMM’s Precipitation Radar, and a network of rain gauges, to see if urban-induced abnormal rainfall existed," he said.

Using data from 1998 to 2002, the researchers found mean rainfall rates, during the warm season, were 44 percent greater downwind of Houston than upwind, even though the regions share the same climate. They also found rainfall rates were 29 percent greater over the city than upwind. Rainfall rates indicate how hard it rains and can be an indicator of enhanced thunderstorm activity.

To rule out any effects from the coastline curvature near Houston on thunderstorm development, the researchers divided the entire Texas coast into seven zones extending 100 kilometers (62 miles) inland and including four or five major inlets or bays. Analysis of rainfall data in these zones showed abnormal rainfall only occurred over and downwind of Houston, which suggested effects from the urban landscape were significant. At the coastlines, TRMM satellite data were important, because they allowed researchers to assess rainfall data in areas where there were no gauges and records, like over the ocean.

A companion paper by the researchers, presented in March at a Geological Society of America meeting in Kansas City, Mo., stated urban areas also affect the timing of rainfall. Compared to upwind areas, there were nearly two times as many occurrences of rainfall from noon to midnight in the urban area. This finding has significant implications for flood control in Houston, Burian said.

NASA’s Earth Science Enterprise, which supported this study, is dedicated to understanding the Earth as an integrated system and applying Earth System Science to improve prediction of climate, weather and natural hazards using the unique vantage point of space.

Krishna Ramanujan | GSFC
Further information:
http://www.gsfc.nasa.gov/topstory/2003/0523urbanrainfall.html
http://www.gsfc.nasa.gov/

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Salish seafloor mapping identifies earthquake and tsunami risks
25.04.2019 | Seismological Society of America

nachricht Geomagnetic jerks finally reproduced and explained
23.04.2019 | CNRS

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Full speed ahead for SmartEEs at Automotive Interiors Expo 2019

Flexible, organic and printed electronics conquer everyday life. The forecasts for growth promise increasing markets and opportunities for the industry. In Europe, top institutions and companies are engaged in research and further development of these technologies for tomorrow's markets and applications. However, access by SMEs is difficult. The European project SmartEEs - Smart Emerging Electronics Servicing works on the establishment of a European innovation network, which supports both the access to competences as well as the support of the enterprises with the assumption of innovations and the progress up to the commercialization.

It surrounds us and almost unconsciously accompanies us through everyday life - printed electronics. It starts with smart labels or RFID tags in clothing, we...

Im Focus: Energy-saving new LED phosphor

The human eye is particularly sensitive to green, but less sensitive to blue and red. Chemists led by Hubert Huppertz at the University of Innsbruck have now developed a new red phosphor whose light is well perceived by the eye. This increases the light yield of white LEDs by around one sixth, which can significantly improve the energy efficiency of lighting systems.

Light emitting diodes or LEDs are only able to produce light of a certain colour. However, white light can be created using different colour mixing processes.

Im Focus: Quantum gas turns supersolid

Researchers led by Francesca Ferlaino from the University of Innsbruck and the Austrian Academy of Sciences report in Physical Review X on the observation of supersolid behavior in dipolar quantum gases of erbium and dysprosium. In the dysprosium gas these properties are unprecedentedly long-lived. This sets the stage for future investigations into the nature of this exotic phase of matter.

Supersolidity is a paradoxical state where the matter is both crystallized and superfluid. Predicted 50 years ago, such a counter-intuitive phase, featuring...

Im Focus: Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

A stellar flare 10 times more powerful than anything seen on our sun has burst from an ultracool star almost the same size as Jupiter

  • Coolest and smallest star to produce a superflare found
  • Star is a tenth of the radius of our Sun
  • Researchers led by University of Warwick could only see...

Im Focus: Quantum simulation more stable than expected

A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers which are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. This brings such digital quantum simulation within reach on quantum devices available today.

Quantum computers promise to solve certain computational problems exponentially faster than any classical machine. “A particularly promising application is the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

Fraunhofer FHR at the IEEE Radar Conference 2019 in Boston, USA

09.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

High-efficiency thermoelectric materials: New insights into tin selenide

25.04.2019 | Materials Sciences

Salish seafloor mapping identifies earthquake and tsunami risks

25.04.2019 | Earth Sciences

Using DNA templates to harness the sun's energy

25.04.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>