Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Ocean robots watching our climate

19.11.2002


A new array of ocean robots has begun working deep in the Indian Ocean to help scientists understand Australia’s changing climate.



"This is a key region for the global climate system and installation of the robots will provide our best coverage to begin to understand how the Indian Ocean affects our climate," says CSIRO’s Dr Gary Meyers.

Cycling between the surface and a depth of two kilometres every 10 days, the ocean robots are sampling conditions in a region thought to be a source of southern Australian rainfall.


"We want to understand the mechanism of so-called ’northwest cloud bands’ and the possibility that subsurface ocean conditions control how frequently they form," Dr Meyers said.

CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology will have 19 new Argo ocean robots in place by Christmas, completing an array of profiling floats extending from Indonesia to Cape Leeuwin in Western Australia, as the Australian contribution in an international effort to observe the world’s oceans.

Nearly 600 of the ocean profilers have been deployed globally with 3,000 profilers due in place by 2006.

The information collected by the robots about water temperature, salinity and ocean currents is sent via satellite to ground stations and to research organisations.

"This is a key region for the global climate system and the instrument placements will provide our best coverage to begin to understand how the Indian Ocean affects climate in our region, says Dr Meyers."

He was speaking following an international conference in Mauritius to shape development of the Indian Ocean Observing System. Dr Meyers convened the climate sessions.

The conference was called to identify the needs of, and potential contributions to an ocean monitoring program benefitting all the countries around the Indian Ocean rim.

The Argo robotic floats may ultimately form part of a larger monitoring program to uncover the role that the Indian Ocean plays in the monsoons of the continents of Africa, Asia and Australia.

"Improved climate prediction for the nations around the Indian Ocean would impact on the lives of almost two thirds of the world’s population," says Dr Meyers.

In addition to floats, participants at the conference planned an integrated observing system that utilises data collected by moored and drifting instruments, merchant ships and satellites, and combines the different data types in a computer-generated ocean state estimation.

"There was tremendous enthusiasm from all the country-representatives to develop a basin-wide ocean monitoring system as the basis of a predictive system for understanding climate change, for identifying impacts on the marine environment and for prediction of rainfall variability.

"The benefits begin with basic regional climate research but have substantial environmental, economic and social implications," Dr Meyers said.

Two of Australia’s major partnerships in ocean-observation were represented at the conference. The Indonesian Agency for Ocean Research and Fisheries (BRKP) is also assisting with regional float deployments, with the help of the Darwin-based commercial shipping industry, Perkins.

The Australia-United States Climate Action Partnership announced in February, 2002 by Environment Minister Dr David Kemp facilitates international cooperation on climate change issues. The partnership is focused on practical emission reduction activities, and exchange of scientific expertise, technology and innovation that offer mutual benefits to the two countries.

Rosie Schmedding | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.marine.csiro.au/LeafletsFolder/49float/49float.html
http://www-argo.ucsd.edu/

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht A Volcanic Binge And Its Frosty Hangover
21.02.2019 | Universität Heidelberg

nachricht Researchers get to the bottom of fairy circles
21.02.2019 | Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: (Re)solving the jet/cocoon riddle of a gravitational wave event

An international research team including astronomers from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has combined radio telescopes from five continents to prove the existence of a narrow stream of material, a so-called jet, emerging from the only gravitational wave event involving two neutron stars observed so far. With its high sensitivity and excellent performance, the 100-m radio telescope in Effelsberg played an important role in the observations.

In August 2017, two neutron stars were observed colliding, producing gravitational waves that were detected by the American LIGO and European Virgo detectors....

Im Focus: Light from a roll – hybrid OLED creates innovative and functional luminous surfaces

Up to now, OLEDs have been used exclusively as a novel lighting technology for use in luminaires and lamps. However, flexible organic technology can offer much more: as an active lighting surface, it can be combined with a wide variety of materials, not just to modify but to revolutionize the functionality and design of countless existing products. To exemplify this, the Fraunhofer FEP together with the company EMDE development of light GmbH will be presenting hybrid flexible OLEDs integrated into textile designs within the EU-funded project PI-SCALE for the first time at LOPEC (March 19-21, 2019 in Munich, Germany) as examples of some of the many possible applications.

The Fraunhofer FEP, a provider of research and development services in the field of organic electronics, has long been involved in the development of...

Im Focus: Regensburg physicists watch electron transfer in a single molecule

For the first time, an international team of scientists based in Regensburg, Germany, has recorded the orbitals of single molecules in different charge states in a novel type of microscopy. The research findings are published under the title “Mapping orbital changes upon electron transfer with tunneling microscopy on insulators” in the prestigious journal “Nature”.

The building blocks of matter surrounding us are atoms and molecules. The properties of that matter, however, are often not set by these building blocks...

Im Focus: University of Konstanz gains new insights into the recent development of the human immune system

Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens

Cell biologists from the University of Konstanz shed light on a recent evolutionary process in the human immune system and publish their findings in the...

Im Focus: Transformation through Light

Laser physicists have taken snapshots of carbon molecules C₆₀ showing how they transform in intense infrared light

When carbon molecules C₆₀ are exposed to an intense infrared light, they change their ball-like structure to a more elongated version. This has now been...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Global Legal Hackathon at HAW Hamburg

11.02.2019 | Event News

The world of quantum chemistry meets in Heidelberg

30.01.2019 | Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

JILA researchers make coldest quantum gas of molecules

22.02.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Understanding high efficiency of deep ultraviolet LEDs

22.02.2019 | Materials Sciences

Russian scientists show changes in the erythrocyte nanostructure under stress

22.02.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>