Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

NASA 3-D Image Clearly Shows Wind Shear's Effect on Tropical Storm Gabrielle

12.09.2013
Data obtained from NASA's TRMM satellite was used to create a 3-D image of Tropical Storm Gabrielle's rainfall that clearly showed wind shear pushed all of the storm's the rainfall east of its center.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as "TRMM" flew directly above tropical Storm Gabrielle on September 10, 2013 at 2124 UTC (5:24 p.m. EDT) as the storm approached Bermuda. TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) data found that rain was falling at a rate of over 127mm/~5 inches per hour in a line of intense storms southeast of Bermuda. TRMM PR also found that the tallest thunderstorms, reaching to heights above 15.5km (~9.6 miles), were located in an area close to Gabrielle's center of circulation.


This 3-D image of Tropical Storm Gabrielle's rainfall was created by data from NASA's TRMM satellite, and clearly shows wind shear had pushed all the rainfall east of center.
Image Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce

Wind shear was affecting Gabrielle on Sept. 10 and continued to affect the storm on Sept. 11. Winds are blowing from the southwest at 15 to 20 knots and pushing the clouds and rain associated with Gabrielle to the northeast of the center. On Sept. 11, tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 115 miles/185 km, and because of wind shear, those strong winds were mostly northeast of the center.

Wind shear is basically any change in wind speed or direction along a straight line. In reference to tropical cyclones it means winds vertically from the ocean surface to top of the troposphere. Wind shear removes the heat and moisture that tropical cyclones require around their center of circulation and it will elongate the storm. When a storm elongates, basically the top is blown away from the bottom part of the storm, tilting the circulation center (think of tilting a tire at a 45 degree angle for example). Whenever the center tilts, it can't rotate as easily, and it's a less-efficient heat engine, so winds coming in at the low levels and flowing out at the upper levels get disrupted, generally causing the storm to weaken.

Although Bermuda's watches and warnings have been dropped, Gabrielle is still expected to bring between 1 and 3 inches of rainfall to the island today. Tropical-storm force winds will wane early on Sept. 11, but rough surf is expected to continue as Gabrielle pulls away.

At 8 a.m. EDT/1200 UTC, Gabrielle's maximum sustained winds were near 50 mph/85 kph and weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours. The center of Tropical Storm Gabrielle was located near latitude 32.4 north and longitude 65.7 west. At that time, Gabrielle was stationary but is expected to start moving slowly to the northwest then turn north on Sept. 12. At 8 a.m. EDT an elevated station at Commissioners Point on Bermuda reported a wind gust of 47 mph/76 kph.

The National Hurricane Center noted that over the next two to three days, whatever is left of Gabrielle is expected to merge with a frontal system moving east.

Text credit: Rob Gutro/Hal Pierce
SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Rob Gutro/Hal Pierce | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nasa.gov
http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/gabrielle-atlantic-ocean/

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Scientists discover Earth's youngest banded iron formation in western China
12.07.2018 | University of Alberta

nachricht Drones survey African wildlife
11.07.2018 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Research finds new molecular structures in boron-based nanoclusters

13.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

Algae Have Land Genes

13.07.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>