Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fast rising bedrock below West Antarctica reveals an extremely fluid Earth mantle

22.06.2018

The bedrock below the West Antarctic ice sheet is rising much more rapidly than expected, revealing a very different Earth structure than previously believed. This discovery has important implications in understanding climate changes in Antarctica

An international team of researchers, with a new study published in Science with DTU Space as lead author, finds that the bedrock below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is rising much more rapidly than expected, revealing a very different Earth structure than previously believed. This discovery has important implications in understanding the past, present and future climate changes in Antarctica.


A picture of Amundsen Sea Embayment in West Antarctica with the ice sliced to show the bedrock and the earth cut to show the crust (brown) the bottom of the lithosphere (red area) and the mantle (yellow). The color gradient indicate the temperature from hot (bright yellow) to relatively cool (dark red). In space we see three satellites flying, from the right, a GPS satellite, GOCE, which measures the static gravity, and Cryosat2, which measures the changes in ice thickness. The ice thickness and the bedrock data are from BEDMAP2, the mantle temperature and the crustal thickness is derived from GOCE (data from Folker Pappa).

Illustration credit: Planetary Visions/ESA Illustration text: VR. Barletta

The unexpectedly fast rate of the rising earth may increase the stability of the ice sheet against catastrophic collapse due to ice loss. At the same time the rapid rise, known as uplift, also affects gravity measurements. This implies that up to 10 percent more ice has melted off the West Antarctica Ice Sheet (WAIS) than previously assumed.

"The results of our work will provide a very important contribution in the understanding of dynamics of the Earth along with the ice melting processes in Antarctica," said leading author of this new study, postdoctoral researcher Valentina R. Barletta at DTU Space, the National Space Institute at the Technical University of Denmark.

The Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) in West Antarctica alone contributes to 25 percent of all water estimated from melting ice on our planet. To make numbers easier to understand, in one year ASE loses enough to cover an area the size of Denmark (43.000 square km) with a 2.8 meters high layer of ice. The same area (ASE) holds enough ice to potentially raise the global sea level by 1.2 meters or to cover an area the size of Denmark with 11 km of ice.

"The large amount of water stored in Antarctica has implications for the whole planet, but especially for northern Europe", said Barletta, "because of a combination of gravitational effects, surprisingly, the ice lost in Antarctica mostly raises the sea level here, in northern Europe. In contrast, the ice lost in Greenland has no effect here, but it raises the sea level in the southern hemisphere and further destabilizes the WAIS."

"The uplift velocity in ASE was measured at up to 41 millimeters per year, one of the fastest rates ever recorded in glaciated areas. In comparison, the GPS stations installed nearby the Greenland ice streams record up to 30 millimeters per year, but we know that it is caused by an immediate elastic rebound of the earth, acting like a spring" said Abbas Khan, one of the coauthors and associate professor at DTU Space.

Participating researchers led by scientists at the Ohio State University (OSU) installed a series of GPS stations on rock outcrops around the ASE to measure its rise in response to thinning ice. "The rapid rise of the bedrock in this part of Antarctica suggests that the geology underneath the ice is different from what scientists had previously believed. The rate of uplift we found is unusual and very surprising. It's a game changer," said Terry Wilson, one of the leaders of the study and professor emeritus of Earth Sciences at OSU.

Under the massive weight of ice the earth subsides. "When the ice melts and gets thinner, the earth readjusts, and rises immediately by a few millimeters, which depends on the ice lost," explains Valentina Barletta. "But the earth also acts a bit like a very hard memory-foam mattress. And it slowly keeps readjusting for several thousand years after the melting. In Scandinavia the bedrock is still rising about 10 millimeters per year because of the last ice age."

Scientists call this delayed readjustment Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA), which can also be described as the Earth retaining memory of the ice lost in the past. How fast this readjustment takes place, depends on the properties of the mantle, the portion inside the earth between the crust and the core that is 2900 kilometers thick.

"Thanks to the satellite observations, we were able to estimate the current ice thinning in ASE, and conclude that the measured uplift rate is up to 4 times larger than expected based on the current ice melting rates", says Barletta. Therefore the new study focused on the delayed readjustment of the Earth.

Valentina R. Barletta has run thousands of GIA simulations using different possible combinations of Earth properties and ice loss scenarios and found that the only way to produce such high uplift is for the Earth mantle to be very fluid (technically low viscosity).

"Normally we would see significant uplift happen slowly over thousands of years after the ice age, but here we see it take place in centuries or even decades. This tells us that the mantle below is very fluid and moves quickly when the weight of the ice is taken off," said Barletta. And the uplift is getting faster. According to this new study, in 100 years, the uplift rates at the GPS sites will be 2.5 to 3.5 times more rapid than currently observed.

Among the direct consequences of this study there is a revised estimate of the ice loss in ASE. When a massive amount of the ice melts it reduces the local gravity and leaves fingerprints that can be measured by satellites and used to estimate the total mass lost. But the earth's readjustment also produces a gravity change that partially compensates for this loss and hides the ice signal. "Now we know that in ASE the earth readjusts so fast that 10 percent of the ice loss was hidden, but now we can fix that," said Barletta.

The fast earth response is potential good news for the future of the WAIS. In this area of Antarctica most of the ice is grounded below sea level, and therefore vulnerable to melting from below by ocean water flowing in underneath the ice sheet. Here the earth uplift works as a feedback that can slow down the ice retreat in different ways.

The uplift raises the so called 'pinning points' - elevated features that pin the ice sheet to the bedrock, preventing the retreat of the grounded ice. At the same time the uplift changes the inland slope of the ground that becomes more effective in holding the ice from sliding away. In addition, the massive amount of the ice lost reduces the local gravity and the gravitational pull on the water, resulting in a lower sea level at the adjacent Antarctic coast. This in turn reduces the buoyancy of the whole ice sheet, promoting the stability of the ice sheet.

Modeling studies have shown that bedrock uplift could theoretically protect WAIS from collapse, at least in case of moderate climate changes. But it was believed that the process would take too long to have practical effects.

The mantle that we discovered under ASE is more fluid and hotter, and therefore the earth uplifts faster than in the most optimistic hypotheses used in previous studies. "Under many realistic climate models, this should be enough to stabilize the ice sheet," Wilson said. But, if future global warming is too extreme, according to the scientists the WAIS will most likely still collapse regardless of stabilizing feedbacks.

"Apart from giving us a new picture of the earth dynamics in Antarctica, the new findings will push to improve ice models for WAIS to get a more precise picture of what will happen in the future" said Barletta. "They also tell that we clearly need to improve our knowledge of the Earth structure under the whole Antarctic continent. To do so we use GPS in the few areas where they can be installed, and elsewhere we use data from ESA's Earth Explorer GOCE and seismic tomography."

Media Contact

Valentina Barletta, DTU Space
vrba@space.dtu.dk
45-52-68-66-41

 @DTUtweet

http://www.dtu.dk 

Valentina Barletta, DTU Space | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aao1447

Further reports about: Antarctic Antarctica GPs climate changes ice age ice sheet sea level

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Tiny satellites reveal water dynamics in thousands of northern lakes
15.02.2019 | Brown University

nachricht Artificial Intelligence to boost Earth system science
14.02.2019 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biogeochemie

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Light from a roll – hybrid OLED creates innovative and functional luminous surfaces

Up to now, OLEDs have been used exclusively as a novel lighting technology for use in luminaires and lamps. However, flexible organic technology can offer much more: as an active lighting surface, it can be combined with a wide variety of materials, not just to modify but to revolutionize the functionality and design of countless existing products. To exemplify this, the Fraunhofer FEP together with the company EMDE development of light GmbH will be presenting hybrid flexible OLEDs integrated into textile designs within the EU-funded project PI-SCALE for the first time at LOPEC (March 19-21, 2019 in Munich, Germany) as examples of some of the many possible applications.

The Fraunhofer FEP, a provider of research and development services in the field of organic electronics, has long been involved in the development of...

Im Focus: Regensburg physicists watch electron transfer in a single molecule

For the first time, an international team of scientists based in Regensburg, Germany, has recorded the orbitals of single molecules in different charge states in a novel type of microscopy. The research findings are published under the title “Mapping orbital changes upon electron transfer with tunneling microscopy on insulators” in the prestigious journal “Nature”.

The building blocks of matter surrounding us are atoms and molecules. The properties of that matter, however, are often not set by these building blocks...

Im Focus: University of Konstanz gains new insights into the recent development of the human immune system

Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens

Cell biologists from the University of Konstanz shed light on a recent evolutionary process in the human immune system and publish their findings in the...

Im Focus: Transformation through Light

Laser physicists have taken snapshots of carbon molecules C₆₀ showing how they transform in intense infrared light

When carbon molecules C₆₀ are exposed to an intense infrared light, they change their ball-like structure to a more elongated version. This has now been...

Im Focus: Famous “sandpile model” shown to move like a traveling sand dune

Researchers at IST Austria find new property of important physical model. Results published in PNAS

The so-called Abelian sandpile model has been studied by scientists for more than 30 years to better understand a physical phenomenon called self-organized...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Global Legal Hackathon at HAW Hamburg

11.02.2019 | Event News

The world of quantum chemistry meets in Heidelberg

30.01.2019 | Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

New therapeutic approach to combat African sleeping sickness

20.02.2019 | Life Sciences

Powering a pacemaker with a patient's heartbeat

20.02.2019 | Medical Engineering

The holy grail of nanowire production

20.02.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>