Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fractal-shaped tiles developed for new broadband antenna class

20.10.2003


Penn State engineers have developed innovative design methods for a new class of antennas composed of an array of fractal-shaped tiles that offer anywhere from a 4:1 to 8:1 improvement in bandwidth compared to their conventional counterparts.


Douglas H. Werner, professor of electrical engineering and senior scientist, Applied Research Laboratory, Penn State in front of tiles at the Alhambra, Granada, Spain.



Many natural objects, such as tree branches and their root systems, peaks and valleys in a landscape and rivers and their tributaries are versions of mathematical fractals which appear pleasingly irregular to the eye but are actually made of self-similar, repeated units.

The new broadband antennas are composed of irregular but self-similar, repeated fractal-shaped unit tiles or "fractiles" which cover an entire plane without any gaps or overlaps. The outer boundary contour of an array built of fractiles follows a fractal distribution.


Dr. Douglas H. Werner, professor of electrical engineering and senior scientist in Penn State’s Applied Research Laboratory, will describe the new antennas and their generation at the 2003 IEEE AP-S Topical Conference on Wireless Communication Technology, Oct. 16, in Honolulu, Hawaii. His paper is "A New Design Methodology for Modular Broadband Arrays Based on Fractal Tilings." His co-authors are Waroth Kuhirun, graduate student, and Dr. Pingjuan Werner, associate professor of electrical engineering.

While fractal concepts have been used previously in antenna design, Werner and his research team are the first to introduce a design approach for broadband phased array antenna systems that combines aspects of tiling theory with fractal geometry.

Once the specific fractile array has been designed, the Penn State team exploits the fact that fractal arrays are generated recursively or via successive stages of growth starting from a simple initial unit, to develop fast recursive algorithms for calculating radiation patterns. Using the recursive property, they have also developed rapid algorithms for adaptive beam forming, especially for arrays with multiple stages of growth that contain a relatively large number of elements.

Werner says, "The availability of fast beam forming algorithms is especially advantageous for designing smart antenna systems." The Penn State team has also shown that a fractile array made of unit tiles based on the Peano-Gosper curve, for example, offers performance advantages over a similar-sized array with conventional square boundaries. The Peano-Gosper fractile array produces no grating lobes over a much wider frequency band than conventional periodic planar square arrays.

Werner explains that "Grating lobes are sidelobes with the same intensity as the mainbeam. They are undesirable because they take energy away from the main beam and focus it in unintended directions, causing a reduction in the gain of an antenna array." The University is patenting the team’s approach to Peano-Gosper and related fractile arrays. The team has also been awarded a grant through the Applied Research Laboratory to build and test a prototype.

Barbara Hale | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.psu.edu/

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht New cruise ship “Mein Schiff 1” features Fraunhofer 3D sound on board
05.09.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

nachricht Small enclosure, big sound, clear speech
31.08.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: 'Nanochains' could increase battery capacity, cut charging time

How long the battery of your phone or computer lasts depends on how many lithium ions can be stored in the battery's negative electrode material. If the battery runs out of these ions, it can't generate an electrical current to run a device and ultimately fails.

Materials with a higher lithium ion storage capacity are either too heavy or the wrong shape to replace graphite, the electrode material currently used in...

Im Focus: Stevens team closes in on 'holy grail' of room temperature quantum computing chips

Photons interact on chip-based system with unprecedented efficiency

To process information, photons must interact. However, these tiny packets of light want nothing to do with each other, each passing by without altering the...

Im Focus: Happy hour for time-resolved crystallography

Researchers from the Department of Atomically Resolved Dynamics of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg, the University of Hamburg and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) outstation in the city have developed a new method to watch biomolecules at work. This method dramatically simplifies starting enzymatic reactions by mixing a cocktail of small amounts of liquids with protein crystals. Determination of the protein structures at different times after mixing can be assembled into a time-lapse sequence that shows the molecular foundations of biology.

The functions of biomolecules are determined by their motions and structural changes. Yet it is a formidable challenge to understand these dynamic motions.

Im Focus: Modular OLED light strips

At the International Symposium on Automotive Lighting 2019 (ISAL) in Darmstadt from September 23 to 25, 2019, the Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, a provider of research and development services in the field of organic electronics, will present OLED light strips of any length with additional functionalities for the first time at booth no. 37.

Almost everyone is familiar with light strips for interior design. LED strips are available by the metre in DIY stores around the corner and are just as often...

Im Focus: Tomorrow´s coolants of choice

Scientists assess the potential of magnetic-cooling materials

Later during this century, around 2060, a paradigm shift in global energy consumption is expected: we will spend more energy for cooling than for heating....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Technologies: International Symposium „Future Optics“ in Hannover

19.09.2019 | Event News

Society 5.0: putting humans at the heart of digitalisation

10.09.2019 | Event News

Interspeech 2019 conference: Alexa and Siri in Graz

04.09.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

On the trail of self-healing processes: Bayreuth biochemists reveal insights into extraordinary regenerative ability

23.09.2019 | Life Sciences

New method for the measurement of nano-structured light fields

23.09.2019 | Life Sciences

Clarification of a new synthesis mechanism of semiconductor atomic sheet

23.09.2019 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>