Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study shows virtual demonstrations lead consumers to make real purchases

03.09.2003


Seeing really is believing

"Virtual product demonstrations that allow individuals to interact with merchandise create more vivid mental images of the consumer using the products, thereby increasing the likelihood they’ll purchase the item," said Ann Schlosser, UW Business School assistant professor of marketing.

"We’ve found that the more easily individuals can envision themselves using a product, the more likely they are to buy it."



Schlosser studied how consumers’ buying intentions are influenced and affected by their participation in virtual-reality product demonstrations. She found that when users could manipulate products in the virtual world, their likelihood of making a purchase was much higher than when they received this information in a read-only, video or storyboard format.

In her study, participants were asked to spend time at a major manufacturer’s Web site to learn about digital cameras. For those visiting the site with an interactive product demonstration, they could test camera features by pressing the buttons on the camera with their mouse, allowing them to take pictures, preview them, and either save or delete them. According to Schlosser, this simulated virtual interactive product experience increased consumers’ purchase intentions considerably over traditional, non-interactive advertising.

The primary reasons people use the Internet, said Schlosser, are to find useful information and to browse for entertainment. Such motivations have been characterized as ’searching’ versus ’browsing.’ The goal of the research was to examine how individuals process information presented through virtual interactions with a product (object interactivity), and the impact that this has on their buying intentions if they are looking for an aesthetic experience (browsers) or are seeking specific information (searchers).

Schlosser examined how object interactivity affects consumers’ buying intentions even when the user’s goal is merely to browse or search for product information.

Across all experiments performed, object interactivity led to higher buying intentions than when the same information was delivered passively. This finding occurred regardless of whether subjects were searching or merely browsing, or whether they found the site aesthetically appealing.

"Although browsers had more favorable product attitudes after visiting the object-interactive site than searchers did, individuals’ goals for visiting the Web site had no effect on their purchase intentions. After visiting the object-interactive Web site, both browsers and searchers reported that they could clearly envision themselves using the product, which was a significant driver in determining if they intended to buy the product."

Schlosser’s study, "Experiencing Products in the Virtual World: The Role of Goal and Imagery in Influencing Attitudes Versus Purchase Intentions," will be published in the September issue of Journal of Consumer Research.



For more information, contact Schlosser at (206) 685-7497 or aschloss@u.washington.edu.

Nancy Gardner | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.washington.edu/

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht New cruise ship “Mein Schiff 1” features Fraunhofer 3D sound on board
05.09.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

nachricht Small enclosure, big sound, clear speech
31.08.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

Im Focus: Coping with errors in the quantum age

Physicists at ETH Zurich demonstrate how errors that occur during the manipulation of quantum system can be monitored and corrected on the fly

The field of quantum computation has seen tremendous progress in recent years. Bit by bit, quantum devices start to challenge conventional computers, at least...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

How algae and carbon fibers could sustainably reduce the athmospheric carbon dioxide concentration

14.11.2018 | Life Sciences

NIH scientists illuminate causes of hepatitis b virus-associated acute liver failure

14.11.2018 | Life Sciences

The unintended consequences of dams and reservoirs

14.11.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>