Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Groundbreaking virtual catalogue will put 3-D images of works of art online

18.12.2002


Museum curators and researchers who need to view historical artefacts or works of art in museums and galleries such as the Louvre, the Uffizi and London’s National Gallery, should be able to save on their plane and train fares thanks to a unique project being undertaken by computer scientists at the University of Southampton.


Bust of Apollo made in porcelain at the Copeland Factory, 1861. Copyright V&A Museum, London



The project, known as SCULPTEUR, involves building an advanced database to store three-dimensional representations of museum artefacts and works of art together with information about those objects, so they can be studied online. SCULPTEUR is also developing software capable of retrieving individual 3-D images based on their content.

Dr Kirk Martinez and Dr Paul Lewis, from the Intelligence, Agents and Multimedia Group in the Department of Electronics and Computer Science, and Dr Matthew Addis and colleagues in the Department’s IT Innovation Centre, are investigating new ways of storing, retrieving and presenting 3-D models, image sequences and video recordings of artefacts along with some 2-D images and written information.


Dr Lewis said: ’Most existing databases work on finding keywords to retrieve documents, records or images, but little work has previously been done on finding good retrieval techniques based on colours and forms of images.’

’In a content-based retrieval system you can use visual features such as the distributions of the colours or the textures in the images. You can present an image as a query and say "find me more images like this one".

’Human beings can easily see what’s in an image just by glancing at it, but all a computer sees initially is the colour of each of the pixels that make up the image. You have to tell the computer how to recognise different features, to establish when one image is similar to another or to try and identify if they contain similar things.’

Around 2 million of the 3 million Euro project budget comes from the European Union, with the University receiving 800,000 Euros over three years. The other technical partners are Giunti Interactive Labs (the project co-ordinator) and Centrica, both from Italy, and the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Télécommunications, Paris. The museums involved are the Victoria & Albert and the National Gallery in London, the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, the Louvre’s scientific centre (Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France) in Paris and the Museum of Cherbourg.

SCULPTEUR builds on image search and retrieval techniques developed for a previous project entitled ARTISTE (www.artisteweb.org), in which both the Intelligence, Agents and Multimedia Group and IT Innovation were technical partners. ARTISTE focused on 2-D images and enabled the use of non-standard, multi-lingual queries across different image collections, for example, the term "papillon" can be used to find images of "butterfly" paintings in both the Louvre and the National Gallery. SCULPTEUR will extend this work using the latest semantic web technology, which may one day simplify all Web searches and which can take account not just of the words used but also the meaning of those words.

The new SCULPTEUR project will continue to develop this facility for the galleries and explore new approaches to multimedia information handling to cope with the increasing use of 3-D models, object-movie matching and semantic descriptions. Sample 3-D queries being considered for the V&A are "find me the missing part of this pot" or "find me objects of similar size, shape and colour to this one". These certainly provide a challenge to the team of researchers!

Sarah Watts | alfa
Further information:
http://www.sculpteurweb.org

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht Rapid increase in the volume of video transmissions: Work is in progress on a new intelligent video platform
23.06.2020 | Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt

nachricht More focus and comfort at telephone workstations
20.02.2020 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: ScanCut project completed: laser cutting enables more intricate plug connector designs

Scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT have come up with a striking new addition to contact stamping technologies in the ERDF research project ScanCut. In collaboration with industry partners from North Rhine-Westphalia, the Aachen-based team of researchers developed a hybrid manufacturing process for the laser cutting of thin-walled metal strips. This new process makes it possible to fabricate even the tiniest details of contact parts in an eco-friendly, high-precision and efficient manner.

Plug connectors are tiny and, at first glance, unremarkable – yet modern vehicles would be unable to function without them. Several thousand plug connectors...

Im Focus: New Strategy Against Osteoporosis

An international research team has found a new approach that may be able to reduce bone loss in osteoporosis and maintain bone health.

Osteoporosis is the most common age-related bone disease which affects hundreds of millions of individuals worldwide. It is estimated that one in three women...

Im Focus: AI & single-cell genomics

New software predicts cell fate

Traditional single-cell sequencing methods help to reveal insights about cellular differences and functions - but they do this with static snapshots only...

Im Focus: TU Graz Researchers synthesize nanoparticles tailored for special applications

“Core-shell” clusters pave the way for new efficient nanomaterials that make catalysts, magnetic and laser sensors or measuring devices for detecting electromagnetic radiation more efficient.

Whether in innovative high-tech materials, more powerful computer chips, pharmaceuticals or in the field of renewable energies, nanoparticles – smallest...

Im Focus: Tailored light inspired by nature

An international research team with Prof. Cornelia Denz from the Institute of Applied Physics at the University of Münster develop for the first time light fields using caustics that do not change during propagation. With the new method, the physicists cleverly exploit light structures that can be seen in rainbows or when light is transmitted through drinking glasses.

Modern applications as high resolution microsopy or micro- or nanoscale material processing require customized laser beams that do not change during...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2020”: The final touches for surfaces

23.07.2020 | Event News

Conference radar for cybersecurity

21.07.2020 | Event News

Contact Tracing Apps against COVID-19: German National Academy Leopoldina hosts international virtual panel discussion

07.07.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rare Earth Elements in Norwegian Fjords?

06.08.2020 | Earth Sciences

Anode material for safe batteries with a long cycle life

06.08.2020 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Turning carbon dioxide into liquid fuel

06.08.2020 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>