Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Findings from the Swedish part of the European project EU Kids Online

14.12.2011
Sweden has one of Europe’s highest rates of Internet use among children. The increasing number of children online implies increasing opportunities – but also risks.
Yet a majority of 9-16 year olds say that they have not encountered anything on the Internet that has bothered or upset them in the past year.

The Swedish part of the study EU Kids Online also found that most children feel safe doing things that adults often perceive as risky.

However, in response to a general question, one in five (19%) Swedish children said that something on the Internet had bothered or upset them in the last twelve months. This figure varies from one-tenth of the 9-10 year olds to one-quarter of the 15-16 year olds.

One percent of the children said that they in the past year had felt upset when meeting face-to-face with a person they had first met online.

Five percent said that images with an obviously sexual content had made them feel uncomfortable online in the past year.

Most of those who had been cyberbullied in the past year (9 %) said that it had made them bothered and upset.

These are some of the results presented in the report Hur farligt är internet? (How dangerous is the Internet?) published today by NORDICOM’s International Clearinghouse on Children, Youth and Media, University of Gothenburg.

The report covers the Swedish part of the project EU Kids Online, where 9-16 year old Internet users and their parents in 25 European countries have been interviewed. About 1000 children have been interviewed in their homes in each country. The project is headed from London School of Economics and Political Science by Sonia Livingstone and Leslie Haddon, and is financed by the EC Safer Internet Plus Programme.

Many of the interviewed Swedish parents expressed that they would like more information from schools about Internet security. One suggestion presented in the report is therefore that a national directive targeting schools be developed concerning Internet security among young people.

For more information, please contact the Swedish research team, which comprises:
Cecilia von Feilitzen, The International Clearinghouse on Children, Youth and Media, Nordicom, University of Gothenburg

E-mail: cecilia.von.feilitzen@sh.se

Olle Findahl, World Internet Institute and University of Gävle
E-mail: olle.findahl@wii.se

Elza Dunkels, Department of Applied Educational Science, Umeå University
E-mail: elza.dunkels@educ.umu.se

Helena Aaberg | idw
Further information:
http://www.gu.se
http://www.nordicom.gu.se/clearinghouse.php?portal=publ&main=info_publ2.php&ex=342&me=3

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht New cruise ship “Mein Schiff 1” features Fraunhofer 3D sound on board
05.09.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

nachricht Small enclosure, big sound, clear speech
31.08.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Solving the mystery of quantum light in thin layers

A very special kind of light is emitted by tungsten diselenide layers. The reason for this has been unclear. Now an explanation has been found at TU Wien (Vienna)

It is an exotic phenomenon that nobody was able to explain for years: when energy is supplied to a thin layer of the material tungsten diselenide, it begins to...

Im Focus: An ultrafast glimpse of the photochemistry of the atmosphere

Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have explored the initial consequences of the interaction of light with molecules on the surface of nanoscopic aerosols.

The nanocosmos is constantly in motion. All natural processes are ultimately determined by the interplay between radiation and matter. Light strikes particles...

Im Focus: Shaping nanoparticles for improved quantum information technology

Particles that are mere nanometers in size are at the forefront of scientific research today. They come in many different shapes: rods, spheres, cubes, vesicles, S-shaped worms and even donut-like rings. What makes them worthy of scientific study is that, being so tiny, they exhibit quantum mechanical properties not possible with larger objects.

Researchers at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility located at DOE's Argonne National...

Im Focus: Novel Material for Shipbuilding

A new research project at the TH Mittelhessen focusses on the development of a novel light weight design concept for leisure boats and yachts. Professor Stephan Marzi from the THM Institute of Mechanics and Materials collaborates with Krake Catamarane, which is a shipyard located in Apolda, Thuringia.

The project is set up in an international cooperation with Professor Anders Biel from Karlstad University in Sweden and the Swedish company Lamera from...

Im Focus: Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal

Superconductivity has fascinated scientists for many years since it offers the potential to revolutionize current technologies. Materials only become superconductors - meaning that electrons can travel in them with no resistance - at very low temperatures. These days, this unique zero resistance superconductivity is commonly found in a number of technologies, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Future technologies, however, will harness the total synchrony of electronic behavior in superconductors - a property called the phase. There is currently a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Symposium on Functional Materials for Electrolysis, Fuel Cells and Metal-Air Batteries

02.10.2019 | Event News

NEXUS 2020: Relationships Between Architecture and Mathematics

02.10.2019 | Event News

Optical Technologies: International Symposium „Future Optics“ in Hannover

19.09.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Double layer of graphene helps to control spin currents

18.10.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Bio-circuitry mimics synapses and neurons in a step toward sensory computing

18.10.2019 | Materials Sciences

'Flamenco dancing' molecule could lead to better-protecting sunscreen

18.10.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>