Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Protection of Humans and Environment: Research Project State-Funded with Three Million Euros

03.09.2008
Dark wads of smoke consisting of different gases and dust particles, as it is often the case with blazes, always disturbs residents.

Fire departments have handheld devices which help to determine the concentrations of the different gases, but they can only be used close to the ground. And columns of smoke which ascent to a height and travel for many kilometers over the land and come down far away from their point of origin, cannot be detected with the current technology.

To solve this problem, is the goal of the AirShield research program which is funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Last year this project was initiated by the Chair for Communication Networks of TU Dortmund which is also coordinating the project since the beginning of July 2008.

A swarm of wireless cross-linked unmanned aircrafts (UAV-Unmanned Arial Vehicles), equipped with state-of-the-art gas measuring technology, are supposed to measure gas clouds in the troposphere. The air routes of these flying measurment robots are dynamically determined and continuously adapted, so that the swarm can autonomously follow the pollutants. Thus, detailed forecasts about the spreading are possible. And these forecasts are made available to operational commands. Based on this data, danger averting measures can be planned, such as warning the population , informing them how to behave correctly up to evacuation measures in the most affected areas.

Three industrial partners (Gesellschaft für Gerätebau mbH, Dortmund; Microdrones, Kreuztal; GISConsult, Haltern), five science institutes (from Dortmund, Paderborn, Siegen, Berlin and Leipzig) and the Dortmund Fire Department are participating in the development of this innovative system. The project is funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) with three million Euros within the scope of civilian safety research. In the strong competition with other research applications, the Airshield project was successfully nominated as one of the approved schemes from the announcement “Integrated Protection Systems for Rescue and Security Workers”. Project sponsor is the VDI Technologiezentrum, Düsseldorf.

The project coordinator professor Christian Wietfeld, head of the Chair for Communication Networks at TU Dortmund, is very optimistic that AirShield is going to become a big success: “The development of a highly dynamic, interconnected communication network in the air is a big scientific challenge which we are happy to accept. Here we rely on preparatory works which have also received credit in the international context”.

Hans-Jörg Hübner, managing director Gesellschaft für Gerätebau mbH, regards this project as a great opportunity to capture new markets: “Researching into small and light gas sensors for mobile use in the air, safeguards jobs in Dortmund”.

For Klaus Schäfer, chief fire director Dortmund Fire Department, this system means great improvements for the everyday work of fire departments: “The use of self-controlled small air vehicles opens up new chances to prognosticate the spreading of pollutants and to measure their concentration exactly. In the near future AirShield will help to protect humans and environment”. Moreover, areas damaged by flooding or fire, for example, can be observed and measured from above via autonomous drones.

Udo Jürß, CEO Microdrones GmbH, also expects the project to result in an advantage in technology: “The development of remote-controlled drones for civil purposes has just started. The AirShield project will take this versatile technology a big step forward. And we are not going to miss out on the new market which is going to be opened up by this technology”.

“AirShield” stands for “Airborne Remote Sensing for Hazard Inspection by Network Enabled Lightweight Drones”.

Participating in the AirShield project are the following partners:

•Technische Universität Dortmund, Chair for Communication Networks
•Microdrones GmbH, Kreuztal
•Fire Department Dortmund, Institute for Fire Fighting and Rescue Technology – IFR
•Universität Siegen, Chair for Real-Time Learning Systems (Prof. Dr.Ing. Klaus-Dieter Kuhnert)
•GISConsult GmbH, Haltern
•Universität Paderborn, Special Field C.I.K. (Prof. Dr.-Ing. Rainer Koch)
•GfG Gesellschaft für Gerätebau mbH, Dortmund
•Leibnitz Institute for Troposphere Research (Prof. Dr. Eberhard Renner), Leipzig

•TU Berlin, Chair for Innovation Economy (Prof. Dr. Knut Blind)

Two drone animations can be found under the following two links (right click on the link, then “save as …”):

http://www.kn.e-technik.uni-dortmund.de/images/lehrstuhl/Drohne_WMV.wmv
http://www.kn.e-technik.uni-dortmund.de/images/lerhstuhl/MDCockpit2.wmv

Ole Luennemann | alfa
Further information:
http://www.tu-dortmund.de

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Reconstructing the richness of pristine oceans funded by the ERC
28.10.2019 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

nachricht AI for Understanding and Modelling the Earth System – International Research Team wins ERC Synergy Grant
14.10.2019 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biogeochemie

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Atoms don't like jumping rope

Nanooptical traps are a promising building block for quantum technologies. Austrian and German scientists have now removed an important obstacle to their practical use. They were able to show that a special form of mechanical vibration heats trapped particles in a very short time and knocks them out of the trap.

By controlling individual atoms, quantum properties can be investigated and made usable for technological applications. For about ten years, physicists have...

Im Focus: Images from NJIT's big bear solar observatory peel away layers of a stellar mystery

An international team of scientists, including three researchers from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), has shed new light on one of the central mysteries of solar physics: how energy from the Sun is transferred to the star's upper atmosphere, heating it to 1 million degrees Fahrenheit and higher in some regions, temperatures that are vastly hotter than the Sun's surface.

With new images from NJIT's Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), the researchers have revealed in groundbreaking, granular detail what appears to be a likely...

Im Focus: New opportunities in additive manufacturing presented

Fraunhofer IFAM Dresden demonstrates manufacturing of copper components

The Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM in Dresden has succeeded in using Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM) to...

Im Focus: New Pitt research finds carbon nanotubes show a love/hate relationship with water

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are valuable for a wide variety of applications. Made of graphene sheets rolled into tubes 10,000 times smaller than a human hair, CNTs have an exceptional strength-to-mass ratio and excellent thermal and electrical properties. These features make them ideal for a range of applications, including supercapacitors, interconnects, adhesives, particle trapping and structural color.

New research reveals even more potential for CNTs: as a coating, they can both repel and hold water in place, a useful property for applications like printing,...

Im Focus: Magnets for the second dimension

If you've ever tried to put several really strong, small cube magnets right next to each other on a magnetic board, you'll know that you just can't do it. What happens is that the magnets always arrange themselves in a column sticking out vertically from the magnetic board. Moreover, it's almost impossible to join several rows of these magnets together to form a flat surface. That's because magnets are dipolar. Equal poles repel each other, with the north pole of one magnet always attaching itself to the south pole of another and vice versa. This explains why they form a column with all the magnets aligned the same way.

Now, scientists at ETH Zurich have managed to create magnetic building blocks in the shape of cubes that - for the first time ever - can be joined together to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

First International Conference on Agrophotovoltaics in August 2020

15.11.2019 | Event News

Laser Symposium on Electromobility in Aachen: trends for the mobility revolution

15.11.2019 | Event News

High entropy alloys for hot turbines and tireless metal-forming presses

05.11.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Structure of a mitochondrial ATP synthase

19.11.2019 | Life Sciences

The measurements of the expansion of the universe don't add up

19.11.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Ayahuasca compound changes brainwaves to vivid 'waking-dream' state

19.11.2019 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>