Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

American biochemist to receive this year's Inhoffen Medal

11.04.2013
HZI and TU to honour Christopher T. Walsh 25 April 2013 / Press meeting scheduled for 2:40 pm

How do bacteria cope when exposed to toxic mercury, how are they able to outlast antibiotics, and how can they be killed using so-called "suicide inhibitors?" These are but a few of the many research topics US biochemist Christopher Walsh has devoted his career as a scientist to.


The Inhoffen Medal: the most prestigious German award in the field of natural compound chemistry.
HZI

On Thursday, 25 April, Walsh will be honoured for his achievements in Braunschweig, Germany: The Harvard professor will receive the 5 000 Euro Inhoffen Medal, the single most renowned German award in the field of natural compound chemistry.

The prize, which is funded by the Friends of the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI), is awarded on the occasion of the public Inhoffen Lecture, an event co-hosted by the HZI and the Technische Universität (TU) Braunschweig. This year, the Inhoffen Lecture is scheduled for 3 pm on Thursday, 25 April, and will be given in the HZI forum. "The award is bestowed in recognition of Walsh's impressive contribution to science," explains Prof. Dietmar Schomburg, Chairman of the Friends of the HZI.

Bacteria use clever "assembly lines" to make active substances they need to survive. Many of these substances are of medical interest for us humans as they can be used as antibiotics, for example. Christopher T. Walsh, professor at the renowned Harvard Medical School in Boston, USA, is a leading expert in the area of bacterial "factories".

Much of his research has been concerned with the investigation of the structure and function of enzymes, cellular catalysts, to better understand their molecular basis. Among other things, Walsh studied substances known as suicide inhibitors - compounds that, normally, are recognized and converted by some enzyme catalyst. The enzyme mistakes them for natural reaction partners, binds and converts them - leading to production of an inhibitory substance that acts to permanently block the enzyme. Suicide inhibitors that are effective against bacterial enzymes can be continually developed for application in medicine.

Walsh's work also allowed for artificially changing bacterial enzymes. This represents a major step forward for active substance biosynthesis. He also discovered how bacteria evolve resistance to the reserve antibiotic vancomycin - a discovery which helped move production of new antibiotics forward.

On the occasion of the Inhoffen Lecture, the Friends of the HZI will also be recognizing outstanding dissertations in the life sciences. Recipients of the two 1 000 Euro PhD Awards are Dr. Cornelia Chizzali and Dr. Christian Mayer. As part of their doctoral work, Chizzali studied substances that are produced by fruit trees to protect themselves against the plant disease fire blight. Mayer worked on mechanisms of immune tolerance.

In addition to the PhD Awards, the Fritz Wagner Award for advancement of biotechnology will also be bestowed. This year's 500 Euro Fritz Wagner Award goes to Patrick Rabe in recognition of his doctoral work on the synthesis and analysis of secondary metabolites produced by bacteria.

Press meeting
Before the start of the event, at 2:40 pm, media representatives will have the chance to meet the award recipients and take photographs. For additional information, please call 0531-61811401.

Hans Herloff Inhoffen and the Inhoffen Medal
In remembrance of eminent chemist Prof. Hans Herloff Inhoffen who passed away in 1992, the TU Braunschweig and the HZI (at that time called the German Research Centre for Biotechnology, GBF) have been co-organizing the Inhoffen Lecture since 1994. The award by the same name is given on the occasion of the lecture. From 1946 to 1974, Inhoffen taught at the TH Braunschweig and was the university’s acting president from 1948 to 1950. In addition, in 1965, he co-founded the Institute of Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Biophysics (IMB), the GBF’s and thereby the HZI's predecessor.

The Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research
At the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig, scientists are studying microbial virulence factors, host-pathogen interactions and immunity. The goal is to develop strategies for the diagnosis, prevention and therapy of human infectious diseases.
http://www.helmholtz-hzi.de/en

The Technische Universität (TU) Braunschweig
Core disciplines of the TU Braunschweig are engineering and natural sciences. They are closely linked to its other disciplines of humanities and economic, social, and educational sciences. The Technische Universität Braunschweig is one of the leading universities of technology in Germany, as witnessed by its inclusion in the top list, »TU9 – German Institutes of Technology«. Together with Leibniz Universität Hannover and TU Clausthal, the TU Braunschweig forms the Niedersächsische Technische Hochschule (NTH).

http://www.tu-braunschweig.de

Dr. Birgit Manno | Helmholtz-Zentrum
Further information:
http://www.helmholtz-hzi.de

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Ultrasound Connects
13.11.2018 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

nachricht Improving the understanding of death receptor functions in cells
07.11.2018 | Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'

16.11.2018 | Health and Medicine

Good preparation is half the digestion

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Microscope measures muscle weakness

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>