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2010 Underwater Photography Contest Winners Announced

28.05.2010
In its sixth annual Underwater Photography Contest, the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science attracted a diverse array of national and international photographic talent representing more than 20 countries and nearly 600 images which competed in three categories: “wide angle,” “macro,” and “fish or marine animal portrait.” Recognition was also given to the best among University of Miami student entries.

Winning images were chosen via anonymous judging by a panel of experts in underwater photography and fine arts, including underwater photographers Myron and Nicole Wang and Rosenstiel School Marine Biology & Fisheries Professor Dr. Michael Schmale. The competition is open to all amateur photographers who earn no more than 20 percent of their income from their photography.


Awards included a weeklong trip with Blackbeard’s Cruises and cash prizes. Images of all the winning photos are available at http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/support/advancement/uw-2010/w.html

The Best Overall was an image submitted by Luc Rooman of Kieldrecht, Belgium. The photograph depicts a rare, vivid image of two mating cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) photographed off the coast of The Netherlands.

Other winners, listed by category, include:

Macro

1 - Steven Kovacs, Moore Haven, Fla., USA

2- Wendy Carey, British Columbia, Canada

3- Kirk Kilfoyle, Hollywood, Fla., USA

Fish or Marine Animal Portrait

1- Steven Kovacs, Moore Haven, Fla., USA

2- Matt Potenski, Sayreville, N.J., USA

3- Judy Townsend, Boca Raton, Fla., USA

Wide-angle

1- Annelise Hagan, Berks, United Kingdom

2- Michael Gallagher, London, United Kingdom

3- Mauro Ristorto, Caracas, Venezuela

Student Photos

1- Evan D'Alessandro, Key Biscayne, FL

2- Evan D'Alessandro, Key Biscayne, FL

3- Kristine Stump, Bimini, Bahamas

About the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School

The University of Miami is the largest private research institution in the southeastern United States. The University’s mission is to provide quality education, attract and retain outstanding students, support the faculty and their research, and build an endowment for University initiatives. Founded in the 1940’s, the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science has grown into one of the world’s premier marine and atmospheric research institutions. Offering dynamic interdisciplinary academics, the Rosenstiel School is dedicated to helping communities to better understand the planet, participating in the establishment of environmental policies, and aiding in the improvement of society and quality of life. For more information, please visit www.rsmas.miami.edu.

Barbra Gonzalez

UM Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
305.421.4704
barbgo@rsmas.miami.edu
Marie Guma-Diaz
UM Media Relations Office
305.284.1601
m.gumadiaz@umiami.edu

Barbra Gonzalez
Communications Director
University of Miami
Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Virginia Key, FL 33149
Tel: 305-421-4704
Fax: 305-421-4931

Barbra Gonzalez | University of Miami
Further information:
http://www.rsmas.miami.edu
http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/support/advancement/uw-2010/w.html

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