Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

5G transmission masts made of wood for an attractive and sustainable cityscape

20.05.2019

The new 5G radio standard is intended to make our communication and data transmission considerably faster and more efficient. For this to be possible, a sufficient number of transmission masts are needed. In a seminar held in the Department of Architecture at Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, participants discussed the possible design of these masts. For their models, the students have opted for the environmentally friendly material wood. The best designs are currently being constructed. Over the next few weeks, it is planned to install them as part of a pilot project in Kaiserslautern.

5G transmission masts have to be distributed throughout the entire area in order to ensure reliable data transmission. In order not to adversely affect the cityscape, prospective architects have dealt with this topic in a seminar.


The best designs are currently being constructed.

Credit: AG Robeller/TUK

"They had the opportunity to imagine what the streets of the future will look like," says junior professor Christopher Robeller, who heads the Digital Timber Construction Working Group at TUK. "They designed their models of an environmentally friendly 5G base station out of wood."

The Finnish company Ecotelligent Ltd. is also involved in the project and specialises in the development and construction of environmentally friendly wooden telecommunication masts and systems. "All of the students' designs were excellent," Robeller continued. "Yet we had to choose the three best designs."

The Finnish company is currently further developing these designs. These so-called smart masts will then be installed as part of a pilot phase in Kaiserslautern. Therefore the team around Robeller and Ecotelligent cooperates with KL.digital GmbH, an IT company of the city of Kaiserslautern.

This summer, citizens will be asked to choose the best model. If the masts meet expectations, it is possible to use them in other cities all over the world in the future.

"Cities still have to find out how to incorporate environmental impact and urban aesthetics," says Robeller. Wood makes an ideal material in this respect. The students have considered this in their designs: The technology is hidden, but at the same time the city' s aesthetic image is taken into account.

These smart masts can be used at many locations, for example at intersections. Here they can also include additional sensors for intelligent traffic control.

Wood offers a further advantage: Compared to steel masts, the production process produces little or no CO2. In a next step, it would also be possible to dispense with steel connectors such as nails and screws for complex structures in which the masts could also be installed.

How this can be guaranteed is currently being investigated by the team around the architect from Kaiserslautern. Automatic carpentry machines may be used for this purpose, which can easily process the wood based on the corresponding software specifications.

Questions can be directed to:
Jun. Prof. Dr Christopher Robeller
Digital Timber Construction DTC
Phone: +49 631 205-2293
E-mail: christopher.robeller(at)architektur.uni-kl.de

Gyöngyi Mátray, CEO
EcoTelligent Ltd.
Phone: +358 50 355 0905
E-mail: gm(at)ecotelligent.fi

Dr. Martin Verlage
General Manager
KL.digital GmbH
Phone: +49 631 205-894
E-mail: m.verlage(at)kl.digital

Melanie Löw | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
http://www.uni-kl.de

More articles from Architecture and Construction:

nachricht Mobile smart homes and expanded living labs: DFKI and TU Berlin make the future of living more accessible
19.02.2020 | Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz GmbH, DFKI

nachricht Pollination is better in cities than in the countryside
29.01.2020 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

All articles from Architecture and Construction >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A step towards controlling spin-dependent petahertz electronics by material defects

The operational speed of semiconductors in various electronic and optoelectronic devices is limited to several gigahertz (a billion oscillations per second). This constrains the upper limit of the operational speed of computing. Now researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg, Germany, and the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay have explained how these processes can be sped up through the use of light waves and defected solid materials.

Light waves perform several hundred trillion oscillations per second. Hence, it is natural to envision employing light oscillations to drive the electronic...

Im Focus: Freiburg researcher investigate the origins of surface texture

Most natural and artificial surfaces are rough: metals and even glasses that appear smooth to the naked eye can look like jagged mountain ranges under the microscope. There is currently no uniform theory about the origin of this roughness despite it being observed on all scales, from the atomic to the tectonic. Scientists suspect that the rough surface is formed by irreversible plastic deformation that occurs in many processes of mechanical machining of components such as milling.

Prof. Dr. Lars Pastewka from the Simulation group at the Department of Microsystems Engineering at the University of Freiburg and his team have simulated such...

Im Focus: Skyrmions like it hot: Spin structures are controllable even at high temperatures

Investigation of the temperature dependence of the skyrmion Hall effect reveals further insights into possible new data storage devices

The joint research project of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) that had previously demonstrated...

Im Focus: Making the internet more energy efficient through systemic optimization

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, recently completed a 5-year research project looking at how to make fibre optic communications systems more energy efficient. Among their proposals are smart, error-correcting data chip circuits, which they refined to be 10 times less energy consumptive. The project has yielded several scientific articles, in publications including Nature Communications.

Streaming films and music, scrolling through social media, and using cloud-based storage services are everyday activities now.

Im Focus: New synthesis methods enhance 3D chemical space for drug discovery

After helping develop a new approach for organic synthesis -- carbon-hydrogen functionalization -- scientists at Emory University are now showing how this approach may apply to drug discovery. Nature Catalysis published their most recent work -- a streamlined process for making a three-dimensional scaffold of keen interest to the pharmaceutical industry.

"Our tools open up whole new chemical space for potential drug targets," says Huw Davies, Emory professor of organic chemistry and senior author of the paper.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

70th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Around 70 Laureates set to meet with young scientists from approx. 100 countries

12.02.2020 | Event News

11th Advanced Battery Power Conference, March 24-25, 2020 in Münster/Germany

16.01.2020 | Event News

Laser Colloquium Hydrogen LKH2: fast and reliable fuel cell manufacturing

15.01.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Sweet beaks: What Galapagos finches and marine bacteria have in common

20.02.2020 | Life Sciences

Social networks reveal dating in blue tits

20.02.2020 | Life Sciences

More focus and comfort at telephone workstations

20.02.2020 | Communications Media

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>