Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Camera reveals fish quality

11.03.2008
Ekrem Misimi, a research scientist at SINTEF Fisheries and Aquaculture Research, has recently defended his doctoral thesis on accurate mathematical descriptions that enable machines to sort fish according to quality.

Misimi has combined machine vision with pattern recognition methods, and has fed geometrical descriptions of the size, colour and shape of salmon into a PC, which then grades the fish according to its quality.

“The Norwegian fish-processing industry has been slow to introduce modern technology, and the production costs of a kilo of salmon in this country are an average of 5 – 10 kroner higher than in countries that compete with us. Exports of processed salmon are also still low, so the industry has a lot to gain by adopting these new methods,” says Misimi.

Uneven quality

Today, fish are graded manually by employees who assess their shape, colour and any surface injuries, since consumers demand salmon fillets that are fresh and regular in colour and shape. This can be difficult to achieve using current technology. If the salmon was stressed at the moment of its death, it stiffens more rapidly, and when it is stored on ice its fillets change colour and shape faster than fillets taken from an unstressed fish. Stressed fillets cannot be processed until they have passed through the stage of rigor mortis after two or three days, and meanwhile the product is losing freshness.

Moreover, there may be remains of blood in the stomach cavity from when the salmon was bled. This may leave flecks of blood on fresh and smoked fillets, a common cause of downgrading.

Colour is an important indicator of the quality of salmon fillets, and at present, a special ruler and a colour-matching card are used to sort the fillets that fall within approved limits from those that have to be rejected.

Automation

The new method simply takes photos of the colour cards and stores the values obtained, so that the colour of a fillet can be compared with values from the table. This objective method agrees well with the methods that human being use to analyse colours, and is also rapid and does not require physical contact with the fish.

“Machine vision and image analysis will enable us to sort fish into “production”, “ordinary” and “superior” classes, while revealing blood in the stomach cavity, with an accuracy of 90 percent. Automation can increase productivity and raise processing rates, while companies can avoid having to establish subsidiaries abroad,” says Misimi Ekrem.

Åse Dragland

Contact: Ekrem Misimi, SINTEF Fisheries and Aquaculture Research
Tel: 00 47 982 22 467Email: ekrem.misimi@sintef.no

Aase Dragland | alfa
Further information:
http://www.sintef.com

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Cereals use chemical defenses in a multifunctional manner against different herbivores
06.12.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für chemische Ökologie

nachricht Can rice filter water from ag fields?
05.12.2018 | American Society of Agronomy

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

Im Focus: New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Magic number colloidal clusters

13.12.2018 | Life Sciences

UNLV study unlocks clues to how planets form

13.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Live from the ocean research vessel Atlantis

13.12.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>