Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Nitrogen emissions in dairy pastures peak in the springtime

11.12.2008
The nitrogen emissions from boreal dairy pastures vary depending on the time of year and ley rotation. The emissions peak in spring, when the nitrates accumulated in the soil over the previous summer and winter leach with the melting snow.

Research Scientist Kirsi H. Saarijärvi of MTT Agrifood Research Finland charted the nitrogen emissions caused by intensive grazing in her doctoral dissertation. The topic has not been previously investigated to this extent in boreal conditions.

The experiments were conducted in a 0.7-hectare lysimeter field at MTT Agrifood Research in Maaninka, Finland. A total of 12 basins are placed underneath the field surface, and analyses of the leachates in these basins reveal the nutrient cycle in the pasture. A comparable pasture-size lysimeter field is not known to exist anywhere else in Europe.

The research also involved measuring the ammonia evaporated from the dung and urine of cows by using a chamber process.

LEACHING IS THE KEY ROUTE OF NITROGEN LOSSES

Saarijärvi found that much more nitrogen is left behind on a pasture than in silage cutting fields, since the nitrogen outputs from the pasture are much lower than from silage cutting fields. Most of the nitrogen leaving the pasture is absorbed in the milk produced by the cows grazing in the pasture.

From an ecological perspective, the nitrogen leaching from the soil is the most significant load from dairy pastures.

“The second largest hazard to the environment arises from the ammonia (NH3) evaporating from cow dung and urine, but its volumes have been previously overestimated. The significance of nitrogen loss in surface runoff is low in the conditions prevailing in Finland,” Saarijärvi says.

Nitrous oxide is also emitted into the air from the entire field area, but its emissions are also lower than previously assumed.

NITROGEN PULSE HIGHEST AFTER PASTURE RENEWAL

Saarijärvi stresses that measurements must be carried out throughout the four-year ley rotation in order to gain a representative view of the nitrogen emissions. The nitrogen pulse is especially strong in springtime following pasture renewal.

“The nitrogen accumulated in the ploughed layer is released after pasture renewal. Emissions are smaller in the first years of the rotation, as the grassroots and soil microbes actively bind nitrogen,” Saarijärvi explains.

She found that the springtime nitrogen load is increased since the microbial activity in the soil is not entirely shut down for the winter but merely slows down. Therefore, nitrous oxide resulting from microbial processes in winter is emitted in large quantities as the soil thaws during the spring.

The nitrogen load is greatest in the areas where cattle spend most of the time in the pasture. The watering facility area functions as a congregation area, and it suffers treading damage that destroys the vegetation and soil pore structure, adding to local nitrogen losses.

MANY WAYS TO REDUCE EMISSIONS

The nitrogen emissions from dairy pastures can be reduced by several fairly simple techniques. Saarijärvi notes that emissions can be cut by reducing fertilisation, for example. A white clover mixture, which binds nitrogen directly from the air, can replace fertilisation in good soil conditions.

“The use of protein supplementation for cows should be reduced and the grazing season can be shortened slightly in the autumn. The hot spots of nitrogen cycling can be relieved by moving the watering facility area before the soil around it becomes damaged,” Saarijärvi suggests.

Where possible, it is best to sow the grass in the spring and to use a catch crop that effectively binds the nutrients.

The dissertation of Kirsi H. Saarijärvi, M.Sc. (Agriculture and Forestry), ‘Nitrogen cycling on intensively managed boreal dairy pastures’, will be publicly reviewed at the University of Kuopio on 19 December 2008. Professor Juha Helenius of the University of Helsinki will serve as the Opponent and Docent Helvi Heinonen-Tanski of the University of Kuopio will serve as the Custos.

For more information, please contact:
Kirsi Saarijärvi, Research Scientist, MTT Agrifood Research Finland, tel. +358 17 2644 822, kirsi.saarijarvi@mtt.fi

Ulla Jauhiainen | alfa
Further information:
http://www.mtt.fi
http://portal.mtt.fi/portal/page/portal/www_en/News/Press%20releases

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Cereals use chemical defenses in a multifunctional manner against different herbivores
06.12.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für chemische Ökologie

nachricht Can rice filter water from ag fields?
05.12.2018 | American Society of Agronomy

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Energizing the immune system to eat cancer

Abramson Cancer Center study identifies method of priming macrophages to boost anti-tumor response

Immune cells called macrophages are supposed to serve and protect, but cancer has found ways to put them to sleep. Now researchers at the Abramson Cancer...

Im Focus: Ten-year anniversary of the Neumayer Station III

The scientific and political community alike stress the importance of German Antarctic research

Joint Press Release from the BMBF and AWI

The Antarctic is a frigid continent south of the Antarctic Circle, where researchers are the only inhabitants. Despite the hostile conditions, here the Alfred...

Im Focus: Ultra ultrasound to transform new tech

World first experiments on sensor that may revolutionise everything from medical devices to unmanned vehicles

The new sensor - capable of detecting vibrations of living cells - may revolutionise everything from medical devices to unmanned vehicles.

Im Focus: Flying Optical Cats for Quantum Communication

Dead and alive at the same time? Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics have implemented Erwin Schrödinger’s paradoxical gedanken experiment employing an entangled atom-light state.

In 1935 Erwin Schrödinger formulated a thought experiment designed to capture the paradoxical nature of quantum physics. The crucial element of this gedanken...

Im Focus: Nanocellulose for novel implants: Ears from the 3D-printer

Cellulose obtained from wood has amazing material properties. Empa researchers are now equipping the biodegradable material with additional functionalities to produce implants for cartilage diseases using 3D printing.

It all starts with an ear. Empa researcher Michael Hausmann removes the object shaped like a human ear from the 3D printer and explains:

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

11th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Aachen, 3-4 April 2019

14.01.2019 | Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Mechanical engineers develop process to 3D print piezoelectric materials

22.01.2019 | Materials Sciences

Energizing the immune system to eat cancer

22.01.2019 | Health and Medicine

Early Prediction of Alzheimer’s Progression in Blood

22.01.2019 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>