Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Earlier flowering of modern winter wheat cultivars

20.03.2018

Researchers from Göttingen University study effects of climate change and plant breeding

Changing crop phenology is considered an important bio-indicator of climate change. Researchers from the University of Göttingen together with colleagues from the University of Bonn investigated how the flowering day of winter wheat has changed within the last 60 years.


Field experiment with winter wheat: Comparison of the cultivars “Tommi” (2002) and “Heines VII” (1950) from emergence to flowering.

University of Göttingen


Dr. Ehsan Eyshi Rezaei

University of Göttingen

They analysed nearly 500.000 phenological observations and found that today winter wheat flowering day is 14 days earlier than 60 years ago. In a field experiment they showed that higher temperatures as well as plant breeding both contribute to the trend towards earlier flowering. The results were published in Scientific Reports.

It has been shown before that the recent warming trend causes an advancement in crop phenology resulting in earlier flowering dates. However, little is known about the contributions of changes in sowing dates and cultivars to long-term trends in crop phenology. The researchers analysed a long-term dataset of phenological observations across western Germany spanning from 1952 to 2013.

In addition, they directly compared the phenology of winter wheat cultivars released between 1950 and 2006 in a two-year field experiment and used the observations to parameterise a crop phenology model which was then applied for the whole study period.

“Changes in the mean temperature and cultivar properties contributed similarly to the trends in the flowering day”, explains Ehsan Eyshi Rezaei, postdoc at the Department of Crop Sciences and lead author of the study. “We found a 14–18% decline in the temperature sum required from emergence to flowering for the modern cultivars of winter wheat compared with the cultivars grown in the 1950s and 1960s.”

In contrary, the effects of changes in the sowing day were negligible. “We conclude that previous climate impact assessments overestimated winter wheat sensitivity to increasing temperature”, says Professor Stefan Siebert, head of the Division of Agronomy. “Future studies and projections on climate change effects should therefore also consider changes in cultivars.”

Original publication: Ehsan Eyshi Rezaei et al.: Climate change effect on wheat phenology depends on cultivar change. Scientific Reports, DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-23101-2, http://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-23101-2

Contact:
Prof. Dr. Stefan Siebert and Dr. Ehsan Eyshi Rezaei
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Faculty of Agriculture
Department of Crop Sciences – Division of Agronomy
Von-Siebold-Straße 8, 37075 Göttingen
Phone: +49 (0)551 39-24359
Mail: stefan.siebert@uni-goettingen.de and ehsan.eyshi-rezaei@uni-goettingen.de
Website: http://www.uni-goettingen.de/en/40486.html

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.uni-goettingen.de/en/3240.html?cid=6097
http://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-23101-2

Romas Bielke | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: Agronomy Climate change climate impact crop plant breeding wheat

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Breeders release new flaxseed cultivar with higher yield
11.09.2019 | American Society of Agronomy

nachricht Team of researchers in Vienna has decoded the structure of the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) of rabies virus
29.07.2019 | Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Tomorrow´s coolants of choice

Scientists assess the potential of magnetic-cooling materials

Later during this century, around 2060, a paradigm shift in global energy consumption is expected: we will spend more energy for cooling than for heating....

Im Focus: The working of a molecular string phone

Researchers from the Department of Atomically Resolved Dynamics of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg, the University of Potsdam (both in Germany) and the University of Toronto (Canada) have pieced together a detailed time-lapse movie revealing all the major steps during the catalytic cycle of an enzyme. Surprisingly, the communication between the protein units is accomplished via a water-network akin to a string telephone. This communication is aligned with a ‘breathing’ motion, that is the expansion and contraction of the protein.

This time-lapse sequence of structures reveals dynamic motions as a fundamental element in the molecular foundations of biology.

Im Focus: Milestones on the Way to the Nuclear Clock

Two research teams have succeeded simultaneously in measuring the long-sought Thorium nuclear transition, which enables extremely precise nuclear clocks. TU Wien (Vienna) is part of both teams.

If you want to build the most accurate clock in the world, you need something that "ticks" very fast and extremely precise. In an atomic clock, electrons are...

Im Focus: Graphene sets the stage for the next generation of THz astronomy detectors

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology have demonstrated a detector made from graphene that could revolutionize the sensors used in next-generation space telescopes. The findings were recently published in the scientific journal Nature Astronomy.

Beyond superconductors, there are few materials that can fulfill the requirements needed for making ultra-sensitive and fast terahertz (THz) detectors for...

Im Focus: Physicists from Stuttgart prove the existence of a supersolid state of matte

A supersolid is a state of matter that can be described in simplified terms as being solid and liquid at the same time. In recent years, extensive efforts have been devoted to the detection of this exotic quantum matter. A research team led by Tilman Pfau and Tim Langen at the 5th Institute of Physics of the University of Stuttgart has succeeded in proving experimentally that the long-sought supersolid state of matter exists. The researchers report their results in Nature magazine.

In our everyday lives, we are familiar with matter existing in three different states: solid, liquid, or gas. However, if matter is cooled down to extremely...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Society 5.0: putting humans at the heart of digitalisation

10.09.2019 | Event News

Interspeech 2019 conference: Alexa and Siri in Graz

04.09.2019 | Event News

AI for Laser Technology Conference: optimizing the use of lasers with artificial intelligence

29.08.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Too much of a good thing: overactive immune cells trigger inflammation

16.09.2019 | Life Sciences

Scientists create a nanomaterial that is both twisted and untwisted at the same time

16.09.2019 | Materials Sciences

Researchers have identified areas of the retina that change in mild Alzheimer's disease

16.09.2019 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>