Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV): effective protection possible

28.11.2018

Bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD), caused by the bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), is a serious disease of cattle that is endemic throughout the world. Infection with the virus can result in the death of the animal. But this need not be the case, as a recent study by Vetmeduni Vienna shows. With the proper application of the available measures, it is possible to successfully fight the virus and even eradicate the disease entirely.

Bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) is an infectious animal disease with significant health consequences and global economic impact.


Bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD), a serious disease in cattle, could even be eradticated with the proper application of the available measures.

Michael Bernkopf/Vetmeduni Vienna

On the one hand, the high morbidity and mortality rates, increased premature culling, and decreased reproductive performance among infected animals result in direct losses.

On the other hand, the substantial expenditure needed to control BVDV infections leads to considerable indirect losses.

Against this background, researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna recently published a meta-analysis of previous studies to determine the geographic distribution and temporal development of global BVDV prevalences, associated risk factors, and the impact of vaccination and eradication programmes.

The analysis by the research team from Vetmeduni Vienna revealed a wide variation of BVD prevalences both within as well as between the United Nations (UN) regions studied, although a decline of the BVD prevalences was observed in all UN regions in the past few decades.

This new information is especially valuable: in today’s globalized world, in which international trade in live animals is commonplace, it is essential to ensure that infectious diseases such as BVD are not transported across borders.

Eradication of BVDV is possible

The meta-analysis, the first such analysis of the prevalences of BVDV infections in the global cattle population, indicates that the variation in BVDV prevalences is due mainly to differences in the application of control and eradication programmes (including vaccination).

On average, countries which have implemented control programmes have a BVDV prevalence that is 1.5 times lower at the animal and herd level compared to countries without such measures. The measures are so effective that several countries, such as Sweden, Finland and Norway, have completely eradicated BVDV.

In other countries, for example, in Austria, BVD control programmes have been so successful that authorities have shifted their focus to spot checks.

Asked why not all countries have implemented a national BVD control programme, Beate Pinior from the Institute for Veterinary Public Health at Vetmeduni Vienna, who prepared the study together with a team of researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna, said: “There are several reasons. First of all, there is no international legal basis that prescribes BVDV control.

The eradication of BVDV is a lengthy process involving a high level of resource commitment. In many countries, the focus of animal disease control measures is on illnesses that can be transmitted to humans. These countries provide few funds for the targeted control of an animal disease without zoonotic potential.”

Meta-analysis helps in global battle against BVDV

The present Vetmeduni Vienna study also emphasizes the need for internationally comparable epidemiological studies to inform political decision-makers.

Beate Pinior: “The data presented here are especially significant for veterinary authorities, as they reveal the global BVDV distribution and the potential economic impact of the disease.”

Dangerous diarrhoeal illness in cattle

The bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) causes a potentially lethal diarrhoeal illness in cattle, particularly in calves and young animals. A significant BVDV reservoir are persistently infected (PI) animals, which excrete large amounts of the virus throughout their lives but do not develop antibodies to BVDV.

“The infection of a pregnant cow with BVDV may result in the birth of a non-immunocompetent PI animal. These PI animals spread the infection,” says Pinior.

Meta-analysis covered 325 studies from around the world

The meta-analysis included 325 studies from 73 different countries (covering 10 UN regions) for the period from 1961 to 2016. The majority of the studies was performed at regional level (77.02%), followed by national level (13.04%) and farm level (9.94%).

According to the meta-analysis, the prevalences of persistent BVDV infections ranged from low (≤ 0.8% in Europe, North America and Australia) to medium (> 0.8% to 1.6% in East Asia) to high (> 1.6% in West Asia).

About the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna
The University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna in Austria is one of the leading academic and research institutions in the field of Veterinary Sciences in Europe.

About 1,300 employees and 2,300 students work on the campus in the north of Vienna which also houses five university clinics and various research sites. Outside of Vienna the university operates Teaching and Research Farms. The Vetmeduni Vienna plays in the global top league: in 2018, it occupies the excellent place 6 in the world-wide Shanghai University veterinary in the subject "Veterinary Science". http://www.vetmeduni.ac.at

Released by:
Georg Mair
Science Communication / Corporate Communications
University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna)
T +43 1 25077-1165
georg.mair@vetmeduni.ac.at

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Beate Pinior
Institute of Veterinary Public Health
University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna)
T +43 1 25077-3505
beate.pinior@vetmeduni.ac.at

Originalpublikation:

The article “A meta-analysis of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) prevalences in the global cattle population” by Bettina Scharnböck, Franz-Ferdinand Roch, Veronika Richter, Carsten Funke, Clair L. Firth, Walter Obritzhauser, Walter Baumgartner, Annemarie Käsbohrer and Beate Pinior was published in Nature Scientific Reports.
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-32831-2

Weitere Informationen:

https://www.vetmeduni.ac.at/en/infoservice/press-releases/presse-releases-2018/b...

Mag.rer.nat. Georg Mair | idw

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Interaction with fungus containing N2-fixing endobacteria improves rice nitrogen nutrition
26.11.2019 | American Society of Plant Biologists

nachricht Strengthening regional development through old growth beech forests in Europe
20.11.2019 | Hochschule für nachhaltige Entwicklung Eberswalde

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The coldest reaction

With ultracold chemistry, researchers get a first look at exactly what happens during a chemical reaction

The coldest chemical reaction in the known universe took place in what appears to be a chaotic mess of lasers. The appearance deceives: Deep within that...

Im Focus: How do scars form? Fascia function as a repository of mobile scar tissue

Abnormal scarring is a serious threat resulting in non-healing chronic wounds or fibrosis. Scars form when fibroblasts, a type of cell of connective tissue, reach wounded skin and deposit plugs of extracellular matrix. Until today, the question about the exact anatomical origin of these fibroblasts has not been answered. In order to find potential ways of influencing the scarring process, the team of Dr. Yuval Rinkevich, Group Leader for Regenerative Biology at the Institute of Lung Biology and Disease at Helmholtz Zentrum München, aimed to finally find an answer. As it was already known that all scars derive from a fibroblast lineage expressing the Engrailed-1 gene - a lineage not only present in skin, but also in fascia - the researchers intentionally tried to understand whether or not fascia might be the origin of fibroblasts.

Fibroblasts kit - ready to heal wounds

Im Focus: McMaster researcher warns plastic pollution in Great Lakes growing concern to ecosystem

Research from a leading international expert on the health of the Great Lakes suggests that the growing intensity and scale of pollution from plastics poses serious risks to human health and will continue to have profound consequences on the ecosystem.

In an article published this month in the Journal of Waste Resources and Recycling, Gail Krantzberg, a professor in the Booth School of Engineering Practice...

Im Focus: Machine learning microscope adapts lighting to improve diagnosis

Prototype microscope teaches itself the best illumination settings for diagnosing malaria

Engineers at Duke University have developed a microscope that adapts its lighting angles, colors and patterns while teaching itself the optimal...

Im Focus: Small particles, big effects: How graphene nanoparticles improve the resolution of microscopes

Conventional light microscopes cannot distinguish structures when they are separated by a distance smaller than, roughly, the wavelength of light. Superresolution microscopy, developed since the 1980s, lifts this limitation, using fluorescent moieties. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have now discovered that graphene nano-molecules can be used to improve this microscopy technique. These graphene nano-molecules offer a number of substantial advantages over the materials previously used, making superresolution microscopy even more versatile.

Microscopy is an important investigation method, in physics, biology, medicine, and many other sciences. However, it has one disadvantage: its resolution is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

The Future of Work

03.12.2019 | Event News

First International Conference on Agrophotovoltaics in August 2020

15.11.2019 | Event News

Laser Symposium on Electromobility in Aachen: trends for the mobility revolution

15.11.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

The impact of molecular rotation on a peculiar isotope effect on water hydrogen bonds

03.12.2019 | Life Sciences

SLAC scientists invent a way to see attosecond electron motions with an X-ray laser

03.12.2019 | Materials Sciences

Focused ultrasound may open door to Alzheimer's treatment

03.12.2019 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>