Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Shape separates substance

29.12.2017

Japanese researchers show the phase separation of two substances depends on the topology of the pore

Researchers at University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science (IIS) report a new physical model that shows how the topology of a porous material influences the phase separation of binary mixtures. The model uses two variables, the density field of a porous structure and the composition field of a binary mixture, to show that topology has very different effects on phase separation depending on the porous structure being random and either 2D or 3D. The study can be read in Science Advances.


Two demixed phases [the green and blue phases] are shown together with the porous structure surface (black).

Credit: Hajime Tanaka and Ryotaro Shimizu, Tanaka Laboratory, Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

As IIS Professor Hajime Tanaka, who led the study, explains, the phase separation of binary mixtures, or demixing, in porous materials depends on two factors.

"Phase separation, surface wettability and the geometrical structure of the pore are all interconnected. Structure depends on size and topology. It is very difficult to study topology."

Understanding this influence has applications in widely different fields including battery, medical diagnostics and oil extraction.

Previous studies have generally assumed that pores can be approximated to be an assembly of straight cylinders, but in reality the shapes are random and can take different topologies, complicating the kinetics of the separation. To understand these effects, Tanaka and his collaborator, Dr. Ryotaro Shimizu, developed a novel phase-field model to observe how two mixed substances separate when immersed into a porous material at different levels of surface wettability and two different topologies, 2D or 3D. The model showed a clear relationship between demixing and wetness, but one that was greatly influenced by the topology.

"Only 3D porous structures can be bicontinuous," said Shimizu.

The significance of this distinction leads to unique conformations in 3D structures that Shimizu calls "double-network structures". The result is different kinetics in the phase separation due to different topologies in the pore structure.

"Our study shows that the difference in the pore geometry causes drastic differences in the phase separation," said Tanaka.

###

Research contact:

Professor Hajime Tanaka
Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo
4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan
Tel: +81 3 5452-6125
Fax: +81 3 5452-6126
Email: tanaka@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp

About Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), the University of Tokyo:

Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), the University of Tokyo is one of the largest university-attached research institutes in Japan. More than 120 research laboratories, each headed by a faculty member, comprise IIS, with more than 1,000 members including approximately 300 staff and 700 students actively engaged in education and research. Our activities cover almost all the areas of engineering disciplines. Since its foundation in 1949, IIS has worked to bridge the huge gaps that exist between academic disciplines and real-world applications.

Media Contact

Hajime Tanaka
tanaka@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp
81-354-526-125

https://www.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ja/ 

Hajime Tanaka | EurekAlert!

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Proteins imaged in graphene liquid cell have higher radiation tolerance
10.12.2018 | INM - Leibniz-Institut für Neue Materialien gGmbH

nachricht High-temperature electronics? That's hot
07.12.2018 | Purdue University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

Im Focus: The force of the vacuum

Scientists from the Theory Department of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg have shown through theoretical calculations and computer simulations that the force between electrons and lattice distortions in an atomically thin two-dimensional superconductor can be controlled with virtual photons. This could aid the development of new superconductors for energy-saving devices and many other technical applications.

The vacuum is not empty. It may sound like magic to laypeople but it has occupied physicists since the birth of quantum mechanics.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Small but ver­sat­ile; key play­ers in the mar­ine ni­tro­gen cycle can util­ize cy­anate and urea

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences

New method gives microscope a boost in resolution

10.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Carnegie Mellon researchers probe hydrogen bonds using new technique

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>