Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Motorcyclists keep their cool

23.09.2005


A motorcycling jacket using space technology is on hand to chill MotoGP riders racing this weekend in Malaysia and next weekend in Qatar, should the heat require it.



The Anatomic Intercooler System (AIS) jacket was developed by Italian bike clothing company Spidi and was used last year by Spanish rider Sete Gibernau at the world’s hottest motorbike Grand Prix at the Sepang circuit in Qatar.

It keeps the rider cool inside the suit, helping to maintain a low body temperature even in sweltering desert temperatures.


The novel technology used was originally developed for astronauts’ space suits. Internal cooling is needed to allow astronauts to withstand high temperatures occurring during sun exposure in open space.

"The AIS turned out to be very efficient at Qatar last year. It was used by Sete Gibernau in combination with our hydro-back system, making it possible for him to drink while racing," explains Mattia Vincenzi from Spidi.

The technology was made available for Spidi by ESA’s Technology Transfer Programme (TTP) and the Italian textile research laboratory Grado Zero Espace (GZE), which has already developed several products using sometimes highly unusual space technologies.

"Together with our Italian technology transfer partner D’Appolonia we started the work in 2000-2001 with Italian Grado Zero Espace of transferring cooling technologies from astronauts’ space suits to clothing for people in hot places on Earth," says Pierre Brisson, Head of ESA’s Technology Transfer and Promotion Office.

"This has led to several other very interesting spin-offs, in addition to the AIS from Spidi."

A cooling overall was developed for McLaren’s Formula 1 mechanics, and Henri Pescarolo wore a special helmet with a built-in cooling system while racing in the Dakar 2003 Rally. It turned out to be very efficient in the Saharan heat.

The cool jacket

The AIS is an anatomic cooling system produced to keep the riders’ body temperature low even in extreme heat conditions. It is integrated into a conventional racing suit, offering improved comfort and safety.

"The most difficult thing was to integrate all the AIS vital components together with the anatomy of the suit, because we just could not compromise on the original safety and fitting of Sete’s suit. It’s been tough, but in the end we are really satisfied by the result", explains Lorenzo Faggionato, Spidi chief racing developer.

The cooling system is based on icy-gel-cooled water running through a tube that weaves across the chest and back within a custom-made anatomic vest to be worn under the suit. An ultra-light battery drives a micro pump to circulate the water.

Wearing the AIS system with the hydro-back system, holding about half a litre of water sufficient for a 40-45 minute race, the rider is guaranteed a comfortable body temperature even in extreme hot weather. In addition, riders can drink whenever they need to, no matter how fast they are going.

Improving driving conditions increases both performance and safety, and the two systems are now under evaluation by Spidi for commercial motorcycle jackets.

Pierre Brisson | alfa
Further information:
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMI5W7X9DE_index_0.html

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Research finds new molecular structures in boron-based nanoclusters
13.07.2018 | Brown University

nachricht 3D-Printing: Support structures to prevent vibrations in post-processing of thin-walled parts
12.07.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnologie IPT

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Research finds new molecular structures in boron-based nanoclusters

13.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

Algae Have Land Genes

13.07.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>