Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Testing sticky stuff with a ’fly’s eye’

16.02.2004


A new collaboration at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will contend with lots of sticking points--by design. NIST and industry researchers intend to devise rapid screening and measurement methods that speed discovery of new epoxies, pressure-sensitive adhesives and other products manufactured for the $30 billion global adhesives market.


Arrays of multi-colored dots indicate the strength of different adhesives measured with the NIST multi-lens testing system. Red areas indicate the stronger bonds, blue areas the weaker.



In a project just getting under way, the partners will refine and extend miniaturized technologies for simultaneous testing of hundreds of systematically varying adhesive formulations. One test platform is designed for screening new combinations of components used to make labels, skin patches and other pressure-sensitive adhesives, a fast-growing segment of the market. It includes an array of up to 1,600 "micro lenses," an arrangement resembling a fly’s compound eye. In an automated process, each lens is coated with an incrementally different formulation. The array is lowered until each lens contacts a wafer-like substrate coated with a thin film that also can vary in chemical composition and thickness. The array then is raised until each lens detaches from the substrate.

From measurements of changes in the position of lenses and other preselected variables, researchers can deduce the adhesive strength of different formulations under deliberately varying conditions. A microscope mounted below the testing platform monitors the entire process. The resulting color-coded maps show changes in adhesion energy (an indicator of an adhesive’s strength) as lens and substrate bond and, then, separate.


Another system for high-throughput testing of prospective epoxies and other adhesives for the microelectronics and other industries also is under development as part of this new collaborative effort.


Partners in the project include Intel and National Starch and Chemical, an ICI company. Both Intel and ICI are members of the NIST Combinatorial Methods Center (NCMC) consortium. For more information, go to http://polymers.msel.nist.gov/combi/index.html

Mark Bello | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nist.gov/
http://polymers.msel.nist.gov/combi/index.html

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht New materials: Growing polymer pelts
19.11.2018 | Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

nachricht Why geckos can stick to walls
19.11.2018 | Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First diode for magnetic fields

Innsbruck quantum physicists have constructed a diode for magnetic fields and then tested it in the laboratory. The device, developed by the research groups led by the theorist Oriol Romero-Isart and the experimental physicist Gerhard Kirchmair, could open up a number of new applications.

Electric diodes are essential electronic components that conduct electricity in one direction but prevent conduction in the opposite one. They are found at the...

Im Focus: Nonstop Tranport of Cargo in Nanomachines

Max Planck researchers revel the nano-structure of molecular trains and the reason for smooth transport in cellular antennas.

Moving around, sensing the extracellular environment, and signaling to other cells are important for a cell to function properly. Responsible for those tasks...

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Coherence Tomography: German-Japanese Research Alliance hosted Medical Imaging Conference

19.11.2018 | Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Helping to Transport Proteins Inside the Cell

21.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Meta-surface corrects for chromatic aberrations across all kinds of lenses

21.11.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Removing toxic mercury from contaminated water

21.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>