Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New Research Predicts When, How Materials Will Act

02.03.2015

Research highlighted as a top story for 2014

In science, it’s commonly known that materials can change in a number of ways when subjected to different temperatures, pressures or other environmental forces.


Florida State University

William Oates, associate professor of mechanical engineering

A material might melt or snap in half. And for engineers, knowing when and why that might happen is crucial information.

Now, a Florida State University researcher has laid out an overarching theory that explains why certain materials act the way they do. And the work has been included as one of the highlights of the past year in a top materials science journal, Smart Materials and Structures.

“The basic idea is if I was going to tell you that I can predict that this piece of material is going to break and you asked me how confident I am this is really true, we have to resort to statistics and probability,” said William Oates, associate professor of mechanical engineering at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering. “Ultimately, we would like to say that this material has a 5 percent probability of breaking, for example.”

For Oates’ paper, he specifically examined ferroelectric materials. Ferroelectric materials are materials that experience spontaneous electric polarization, meaning the positive and negative charges occur in opposite directions and can also be reversed. Importantly, the change in charge also produces a shape change that provides a novel material that can be used as an actuator or a sensor or both simultaneously.

Ferroelectric materials are commonly used in the biomedical industry for viewing inside the body using ultrasound imaging. Scientists are also trying to use them for new solar cells.

“The material is pretty pervasive in a number of fields,” Oates said. “So understanding how the material behaves and trying to come up with new compositions is a pretty active area of research.”

Like many scientific endeavors, nothing came easy. His original paper laid out a significantly different theory and was rejected by the journal, so he had to completely go back to the drawing board.

He then stumbled across a quantum theorem and began working with it, comparing quantum simulations of electronic structures with continuum theories often used in engineering design.

It gave him the answers he needed and a stronger backing for a more unified continuum theory that is much faster to calculate relative to quantum mechanics. However, continuum approximations still contain uncertainty.

To address this issue, he used a special statistical method, known as Bayesian statistics, to quantify confidence in the model’s predictive power.

“With this new tool, we can apply it to all sorts of materials and basically quantify how good are we as engineers at approximating nature without spending countless numbers of hours on a computer,” Oates said.

Contact Information
Kathleen Haughney
Research Media & Content Specialist
khaughney@fsu.edu
Phone: 850-644-1489

Kathleen Haughney | newswise
Further information:
http://www.fsu.edu/

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Topological material switched off and on for the first time
11.12.2018 | ARC Centre of Excellence in Future Low-Energy Electronics Technologies

nachricht Proteins imaged in graphene liquid cell have higher radiation tolerance
10.12.2018 | INM - Leibniz-Institut für Neue Materialien gGmbH

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

Im Focus: New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

New discoveries predict ability to forecast dementia from single molecule

12.12.2018 | Health and Medicine

CCNY-Yale researchers make shape shifting cell breakthrough

12.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Pain: Perception and motor impulses arise in the brain independently of one another

12.12.2018 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>