Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

For EVs with higher range: Take greater advantage of the potential offered by lightweight construction materials

21.10.2019

Ultra-high-strength aluminium alloys are the future of lightweight construction in conventional and e-mobility. Fraunhofer Institute for Structural Durability and System Reliability LBF is developing resource-optimized process technologies within the framework of ALLEGRO, the central project of LOEWE – Landes-Offensive zur Entwicklung Wissenschaftlich-ökonomischer Exzellenz (State Offensive for the Development of Scientifically Economic Excellence), with which local component properties can be adjusted to meet future requirements. The scientists evaluate the entire process chain in order to optimize it economically and ecologically and to enable a more sustainable product design.

The expansion of electro-mobility requires electric cars to have longer ranges. Lightweight materials with optimized material properties can help put this into practice. The key to this lies in the combination of ultra-high-strength aluminium alloys and new forming processes so that local component properties can be adjusted as required.


New, fine-resolution testing system for determining the local, process-related influencing parameters on the cyclic material behavior.

Foto: Fraunhofer LBF, Raapke

In order to make optimum use of the lightweight construction potential of aluminium alloys, the geometric and microstructural complexity of products must be increased.

Structural durability plays a central role here. Previous evaluation concepts, however, can only reproduce local material properties to a limited extent due to the manufacturing process.

The Fraunhofer LBF is developing new evaluation concepts for process-related structural durability within the framework of the central LOEWE project, ALLEGRO, taking into account the cyclical transient material behavior, in order to be able to increase the lightweight construction potential of the new manufacturing processes.

»With these more precise assessments, improvements can be achieved in the fatigue life approach of components according to the material. They are an important prerequisite for the industrial application of the new technologies and enable a more sustainable product design in lightweight construction,« explains Maciolek, a researcher at Fraunhofer LBF.

Materials examined down to the smallest Detail

As part of ALLEGRO, the Darmstadt-based scientists are specifically trying to use process-related properties of ultra-high-strength aluminium alloys to improve the service life of components.

For this purpose, the Institute for Production Technology and Forming Machines at the Technical University of Darmstadt and the Department for Separating and Joining Manufacturing Processes at the University of Kassel are developing manufacturing technologies as part of LOEWE's ALLEGRO project in order to implement both ecologically and economically efficient forming processes with integrated heat treatment.

In future, these processes will be used to produce semi-finished products with locally adapted properties that have been calibrated to suit the function and loads of the application in question.

The scientists at Fraunhofer LBF are investigating the entire process chain in order to be able to take advantage of the local process-related properties in terms of lightweight construction using the example of an e-bike frame.

The microstructure and the material properties are influenced by various process steps along this chain, which in turn determine the component behavior. If these local material properties can be determined and taken into account in the design and evaluation of cyclically stressed components and structures, then the potential in lightweight construction can be exploited in a targeted manner.

Since components are usually composed of several semi-finished products, the scientists must also investigate the joinability of the graded semi-finished products. The challenge when it comes to joining is to maintain the property gradation of the semi-finished product or even to introduce it by joining. Suitable joining processes are laser beam welding, friction stir welding and magnetic pulse welding, which will be investigated in more detail in the project.

On November 7, 2019 Andreas Maciolek will give a lecture entitled »Cyclic material behavior of aluminum wrought alloys considering heat treatment and prestrain« at the LightMAT conference in Manchester with current results of the Fraunhofer LBF from ALLEGRO.

Sponsors and partners of the ALLEGRO project are the LOEWE Landes Offensive zur Entwicklung Wissenschaftlich-ökonomischer Exzellenz, the federal state of Hessen, as well as the University of Kassel and the Technical University of Darmstadt.

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

M.Sc. Andreas Maciolek, andreas.maciolek@lbf.fraunhofer.de

Originalpublikation:

www.lbf-jahresbericht.de/en/services/project-overview/lightweighting/allegro-high-performance-aluminum-alloy-components/

Anke Zeidler-Finsel | Fraunhofer-Institut für Betriebsfestigkeit und Systemzuverlässigkeit LBF
Further information:
http://www.lbf.fraunhofer.de

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Theoretical tubulanes inspire ultrahard polymers
14.11.2019 | Rice University

nachricht New spin directions in pyrite an encouraging sign for future spintronics
14.11.2019 | ARC Centre of Excellence in Future Low-Energy Electronics Technologies

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Atoms don't like jumping rope

Nanooptical traps are a promising building block for quantum technologies. Austrian and German scientists have now removed an important obstacle to their practical use. They were able to show that a special form of mechanical vibration heats trapped particles in a very short time and knocks them out of the trap.

By controlling individual atoms, quantum properties can be investigated and made usable for technological applications. For about ten years, physicists have...

Im Focus: Images from NJIT's big bear solar observatory peel away layers of a stellar mystery

An international team of scientists, including three researchers from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), has shed new light on one of the central mysteries of solar physics: how energy from the Sun is transferred to the star's upper atmosphere, heating it to 1 million degrees Fahrenheit and higher in some regions, temperatures that are vastly hotter than the Sun's surface.

With new images from NJIT's Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), the researchers have revealed in groundbreaking, granular detail what appears to be a likely...

Im Focus: New opportunities in additive manufacturing presented

Fraunhofer IFAM Dresden demonstrates manufacturing of copper components

The Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM in Dresden has succeeded in using Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM) to...

Im Focus: New Pitt research finds carbon nanotubes show a love/hate relationship with water

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are valuable for a wide variety of applications. Made of graphene sheets rolled into tubes 10,000 times smaller than a human hair, CNTs have an exceptional strength-to-mass ratio and excellent thermal and electrical properties. These features make them ideal for a range of applications, including supercapacitors, interconnects, adhesives, particle trapping and structural color.

New research reveals even more potential for CNTs: as a coating, they can both repel and hold water in place, a useful property for applications like printing,...

Im Focus: Magnets for the second dimension

If you've ever tried to put several really strong, small cube magnets right next to each other on a magnetic board, you'll know that you just can't do it. What happens is that the magnets always arrange themselves in a column sticking out vertically from the magnetic board. Moreover, it's almost impossible to join several rows of these magnets together to form a flat surface. That's because magnets are dipolar. Equal poles repel each other, with the north pole of one magnet always attaching itself to the south pole of another and vice versa. This explains why they form a column with all the magnets aligned the same way.

Now, scientists at ETH Zurich have managed to create magnetic building blocks in the shape of cubes that - for the first time ever - can be joined together to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

First International Conference on Agrophotovoltaics in August 2020

15.11.2019 | Event News

Laser Symposium on Electromobility in Aachen: trends for the mobility revolution

15.11.2019 | Event News

High entropy alloys for hot turbines and tireless metal-forming presses

05.11.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Structure of a mitochondrial ATP synthase

19.11.2019 | Life Sciences

The measurements of the expansion of the universe don't add up

19.11.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Ayahuasca compound changes brainwaves to vivid 'waking-dream' state

19.11.2019 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>