Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A novel approach of improving battery performance

18.09.2018

A recent study, affiliated UNIST has introduced a novel technology that promises to significantly boost the performance of lithium metal batteries, a promising candidate for the next generation of rechargeable batteries. The study also validates the principle of enhanced battery performance via the real-time in situ observation of charge-discharge cycling.

This breakthrough has been led by Professor Hyun-Wook Lee in the School of Energy and Chemical Engineering at UNIST in collaboration with the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*Star) in Singapore.


Schematic representation of the preparation process and electrochemical behavior of LixSi-modified lithium foil.

Credit: UNIST

Lithium metal batteries are a type of rechargeable battery that has lithium as an anode. Among a number of different cathode materials, lithium metal has the lowest driving voltage and boasts about 10 times more capacity than conventional graphite anodes.

Therefore, it has been gaining much attention as a potential next generation anode material for electric vehicles and large scale energy storage systems.

While lithium metal anode is an ideal candidate for high energy density batteries, fully using it as an anode in commercial cells is still remain elusive.

For example, lithium metal tends to grow into dendritic structures during the continuous charging/discharging processes of a battery, which may result in poor performance. This is because this dendritic structure on the lithium metal surface layer triggers internal short circuits by piercing through the battery separator.

In the study, the research team suppressed dendritic growth of lithium metal anode by coating the lithium foil with a lithium silicide (LixSi) layer. Results showed excellent electrochemical performances in terms of rate capability and cycle stability.

In situ optical microscopic study was also carried out to monitor the electrochemical deposition of lithium on the LixSi?modified lithium electrodes and the bare lithium electrode.

Conventional lithium metal anodes tend to form dendritic structures, which are known to trigger internal short circuits by piercing through the battery separator. However, it is observed that a much more uniform lithium dissolution/deposition on the LixSi?modified lithium anode can be achieved as compared to the bare lithium electrode.

"Our study provides the direct observation on the electrochemical behavior, volume expansion, as well as the lithium dendrite growth of lithium metal anodes," says Professor Lee. "Applying this in real battery will also help contribute to the commercialization of lithium metal batteries."

This research has been supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Education. Their findings have been published in Advanced Materials on July 6, 2018.

###

Journal Reference

Wei Tang et al., "Lithium Silicide Surface Enrichment: A Solution to Lithium Metal Battery", Advanced Materials (2018).

Media Contact

JooHyeon Heo
joohyeonheo@unist.ac.kr
82-522-171-223

http://www.unist.ac.kr 

JooHyeon Heo | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://news.unist.ac.kr/a-novel-approach-of-improving-battery-performance/

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Carbon fiber can store energy in the body of a vehicle
18.10.2018 | Chalmers University of Technology

nachricht Goodbye, silicon? On the way to new electronic materials with metal-organic networks
17.10.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: memory-steel - a new material for the strengthening of buildings

A new building material developed at Empa is about to be launched on the market: "memory-steel" can not only be used to reinforce new, but also existing concrete structures. When the material is heated (one-time), prestressing occurs automatically. The Empa spin-off re-fer AG is now presenting the material with shape memory in a series of lectures.

So far, the steel reinforcements in concrete structures are mostly prestressed hydraulically. This re-quires ducts for guiding the tension cables, anchors for...

Im Focus: Goodbye, silicon? On the way to new electronic materials with metal-organic networks

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz (Germany) together with scientists from Dresden, Leipzig, Sofia (Bulgaria) and Madrid (Spain) have now developed and characterized a novel, metal-organic material which displays electrical properties mimicking those of highly crystalline silicon. The material which can easily be fabricated at room temperature could serve as a replacement for expensive conventional inorganic materials used in optoelectronics.

Silicon, a so called semiconductor, is currently widely employed for the development of components such as solar cells, LEDs or computer chips. High purity...

Im Focus: Storage & Transport of highly volatile Gases made safer & cheaper by the use of “Kinetic Trapping"

Augsburg chemists present a new technology for compressing, storing and transporting highly volatile gases in porous frameworks/New prospects for gas-powered vehicles

Storage of highly volatile gases has always been a major technological challenge, not least for use in the automotive sector, for, for example, methane or...

Im Focus: Disrupting crystalline order to restore superfluidity

When we put water in a freezer, water molecules crystallize and form ice. This change from one phase of matter to another is called a phase transition. While this transition, and countless others that occur in nature, typically takes place at the same fixed conditions, such as the freezing point, one can ask how it can be influenced in a controlled way.

We are all familiar with such control of the freezing transition, as it is an essential ingredient in the art of making a sorbet or a slushy. To make a cold...

Im Focus: Micro energy harvesters for the Internet of Things

Fraunhofer IWS Dresden scientists print electronic layers with polymer ink

Thin organic layers provide machines and equipment with new functions. They enable, for example, tiny energy recuperators. In future, these will be installed...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

Conference to pave the way for new therapies

17.10.2018 | Event News

Berlin5GWeek: Private industrial networks and temporary 5G connectivity islands

16.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Weighing planets and asteroids

23.10.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Fiber-based quantum communication - Interference of photons using remote sources

23.10.2018 | Information Technology

'Mushrooms' and 'brushes' help cancer-fighting nanoparticles survive in the body

23.10.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>