Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

3D-Printing: Support structures to prevent vibrations in post-processing of thin-walled parts

12.07.2018

One of the main features of additive manufacturing processes such as 3D-printing is that the complexity of the component shapes is virtually unlimited. High surface quality in metallic components can frequently be achieved only via milling or grinding operations. But milling of thin-walled parts in particular often cause vibrations which impact negatively on part accuracy and on machining time. The Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology IPT and the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen will be presenting special-purpose support structures which can eliminate these vibrations in post-processing operations at Farnborough International Airshow from 16 – 22 July 2018.

As a rule, metallic components manufactured additively in a Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process, are designed to have larger-than-usual oversize to allow for the functional surfaces to be finished in milling operations since this is the only way of ensuring that all of the surface tolerances and quality requirements can be met.


Support structures for the reduction of vibrations during the post processing by milling

Source: Fraunhofer IPT


Additive support structure increases stiffness of a thin-walled blade

Source: Fraunhofer IPT

Thin-walled parts are particularly prone to vibration in the course of the machining and material removal operations resulting either in poor surface quality or even rendering the components unusable.

The Fraunhofer IPT and ILT therefore expand the design of components manufactured in additive processes, to include support structures which increase the stiffness of the susceptible areas and reduce vibrations.

These supporting elements can be removed with relatively little effort in the course of the surface finishing operation. Parts stabilized in this way can thus be manufactured in higher quality in less time and with lower level of tool wear.

The two Fraunhofer-Institutes, who will be presenting the new concept for manufacturing using additive and cutting for the first time at the Farnborough International Airshow, offer companies interested in becoming our project partners, the opportunity to collaborate in exploring new support structure geometries and in further developing them.

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Vincent Gerretz
Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology IPT
Steinbachstrasse 17
52074 Aachen
Germany
Phone +49 241 8904-273
vincent.gerretz@ipt.fraunhofer.de
www.ipt.fraunhofer.de

Anders Such
Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT
Steinbachstrasse 15
52074 Aachen
Germany
Phone +49 241 8906-511
anders.such@ilt.fraunhofer.de

www.ilt.fraunhofer.de

Originalpublikation:

www.ipt.fraunhofer.de/en/Press/Pressreleases/20180711_support-structures-prevent-vibrations-in-post-processing-operations-for-thin-walled-parts.html

Susanne Krause | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnologie IPT

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Research shows black plastics could create renewable energy
17.07.2019 | Swansea University

nachricht A new material for the battery of the future, made in UCLouvain
17.07.2019 | Université catholique de Louvain

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Better thermal conductivity by adjusting the arrangement of atoms

Adjusting the thermal conductivity of materials is one of the challenges nanoscience is currently facing. Together with colleagues from the Netherlands and Spain, researchers from the University of Basel have shown that the atomic vibrations that determine heat generation in nanowires can be controlled through the arrangement of atoms alone. The scientists will publish the results shortly in the journal Nano Letters.

In the electronics and computer industry, components are becoming ever smaller and more powerful. However, there are problems with the heat generation. It is...

Im Focus: First-ever visualizations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure

Scientists have visualised the electronic structure in a microelectronic device for the first time, opening up opportunities for finely-tuned high performance electronic devices.

Physicists from the University of Warwick and the University of Washington have developed a technique to measure the energy and momentum of electrons in...

Im Focus: Megakaryocytes act as „bouncers“ restraining cell migration in the bone marrow

Scientists at the University Würzburg and University Hospital of Würzburg found that megakaryocytes act as “bouncers” and thus modulate bone marrow niche properties and cell migration dynamics. The study was published in July in the Journal “Haematologica”.

Hematopoiesis is the process of forming blood cells, which occurs predominantly in the bone marrow. The bone marrow produces all types of blood cells: red...

Im Focus: Artificial neural network resolves puzzles from condensed matter physics: Which is the perfect quantum theory?

For some phenomena in quantum many-body physics several competing theories exist. But which of them describes a quantum phenomenon best? A team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Harvard University in the United States has now successfully deployed artificial neural networks for image analysis of quantum systems.

Is that a dog or a cat? Such a classification is a prime example of machine learning: artificial neural networks can be trained to analyze images by looking...

Im Focus: Extremely hard yet metallically conductive: Bayreuth researchers develop novel material with high-tech prospects

An international research group led by scientists from the University of Bayreuth has produced a previously unknown material: Rhenium nitride pernitride. Thanks to combining properties that were previously considered incompatible, it looks set to become highly attractive for technological applications. Indeed, it is a super-hard metallic conductor that can withstand extremely high pressures like a diamond. A process now developed in Bayreuth opens up the possibility of producing rhenium nitride pernitride and other technologically interesting materials in sufficiently large quantity for their properties characterisation. The new findings are presented in "Nature Communications".

The possibility of finding a compound that was metallically conductive, super-hard, and ultra-incompressible was long considered unlikely in science. It was...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on UV LED Technologies & Applications – ICULTA 2020 | Call for Abstracts

24.06.2019 | Event News

SEMANTiCS 2019 brings together industry leaders and data scientists in Karlsruhe

29.04.2019 | Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Bridging the nanoscale gap: A deep look inside atomic switches

22.07.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Regulation of root growth from afar: How genes from leaf cells affect root growth

22.07.2019 | Life Sciences

USF geoscientists discover mechanisms controlling Greenland ice sheet collapse

22.07.2019 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>