Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

When/if to start hormones for prostate cancer patients whose PSA rises after radiation

24.09.2008
Findings also provide guidance on when to forgo hormone therapy

A new Fox Chase Cancer Center study suggests men with early stage prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy should begin hormone therapy immediately if their PSA level rises quickly and doubles within six months at any time after treatment. The study also supports foregoing hormones if the PSA doesn't rise as quickly. Both findings suggest a change in the practice of prescribing hormones is warranted.

After treatment for prostate cancer, many men will experience fluctuations or bounces in their PSA level, but for some the PSA continues to rise and doesn't return to its lowest point immediately after treatment. Knowing if or when to recommend hormone treatment (androgen deprivation therapy) depends on how much and how quickly the PSA rises – called the PSA doubling time. Hormone therapy has been shown to kill cancer cells and improve survival, but it carries a risk of side effects.

"We've been using PSA doubling time to help guide our decision about when to begin hormone therapy, but this study gives us new and critical information that suggests we should start therapy sooner than previously thought for some patients and delay treatment for others," explains Eric Horwitz, M.D., acting chairman and clinical director of the radiation oncology department at Fox Chase, who led the study. "While hormone therapy can have side effects such as hot flashes, decreased libido and osteoporosis, it can help prevent the cancer from spreading to the bones, causing pain and leading to an earlier death from the disease."

Previous studies indicated an increased likelihood that the cancer had spread if the PSA doubling time occurred within 12 months, and thus a potential benefit from receiving hormone therapy. But recently, a newly validated formula, known as the Phoenix definition, used by physicians demonstrates a more accurate way of determining biochemical failure, a term used to describe a significant rise in PSA. Using the new formula, the Fox Chase team was able to determine when earlier action needs to be taken.

"What we now know is that when the PSA rises and doubles within 6 months, versus 12 months, we need to act," explains Horwitz. "Our study suggests that these are the men who will benefit most from hormone therapy." Horwitz's research was presented today at the 50th annual meeting of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.

Also, Horwitz says the study helps identify who is less likely to benefit from hormone therapy which may indicate a necessary change in current practice.

"Men whose PSA rises, but does so over a longer period of time may not benefit from hormones.

"These results further refine the role of PSA doubling time in predicting which patients may benefit from hormone therapy and which patients may be observed expectantly and spared the toxicity of the hormones," Horwitz concludes.

Karen Mallet | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.fccc.edu

Further reports about: PSA PSA level hormone therapy prostate cancer radiation therapy

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Graphene gives a tremendous boost to future terahertz cameras
16.04.2019 | ICFO-The Institute of Photonic Sciences

nachricht Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in Global Change
28.03.2019 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

A stellar flare 10 times more powerful than anything seen on our sun has burst from an ultracool star almost the same size as Jupiter

  • Coolest and smallest star to produce a superflare found
  • Star is a tenth of the radius of our Sun
  • Researchers led by University of Warwick could only see...

Im Focus: Quantum simulation more stable than expected

A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers which are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. This brings such digital quantum simulation within reach on quantum devices available today.

Quantum computers promise to solve certain computational problems exponentially faster than any classical machine. “A particularly promising application is the...

Im Focus: Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications

The technology could revolutionize how information travels through data centers and artificial intelligence networks

Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley have built a new photonic switch that can control the direction of light passing through optical fibers...

Im Focus: A long-distance relationship in femtoseconds

Physicists observe how electron-hole pairs drift apart at ultrafast speed, but still remain strongly bound.

Modern electronics relies on ultrafast charge motion on ever shorter length scales. Physicists from Regensburg and Gothenburg have now succeeded in resolving a...

Im Focus: Researchers 3D print metamaterials with novel optical properties

Engineers create novel optical devices, including a moth eye-inspired omnidirectional microwave antenna

A team of engineers at Tufts University has developed a series of 3D printed metamaterials with unique microwave or optical properties that go beyond what is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

Fraunhofer FHR at the IEEE Radar Conference 2019 in Boston, USA

09.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

New automated biological-sample analysis systems to accelerate disease detection

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences

Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

18.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

New eDNA technology used to quickly assess coral reefs

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>