Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Intergenerational Transmission of Disadvantages in EU Member States

06.07.2007
This Policy Brief reports on our research for EU member countries on the transmission of advantages and disadvantages between generations.

This comparative study has become possible because the 2005 EU-SILC has included one special data module, including the data for attributes of each respondent’s parents during his/her childhood period at the age 14-16.

The central tenet behind such a study is that the disadvantages faced by parents adversely affect their children’s chances of success, and whether public policies could possibly ameliorate such effects.

Results for almost all countries highlight the fact that there is a clear link between the educational disadvantage of the respondent and that of his/her father. In general, the disadvantage link with father’s education is generally stronger for females than for males. The intergenerational transmission of disadvantage is also observed to be stronger for younger age cohorts than for older age cohorts. In most countries the intergenerational effect is higher in relation to father’s education than in relation to mother’s education (Ireland, Latvia and the Netherlands being the only exceptions). With respect to the linkage with the occupational status of fathers, we also find a clear evidence of occupational rigidity (i.e. all those whose father had an elementary occupational status are more likely to belong to the group with elementary occupational outcomes).

These results point to a lack of abilities (or, possibly, opportunities) for people to experience upward occupational mobility. Understandably, these effects are transmitted via a complex set of processes, either through family genes (e.g. hereditary ability), family fortunes (e.g. access to wealth and assets), or through the childhood environment generated by the behaviour and attitudes of parents. The policy interventions to improve outcomes during childhood can be identified as most relevant.

In recent years, interventions to remove childhood poverty have become an important policy priority in many EU countries, and this will be an effective route through which the issue intergenerational disadvantages can be tackled. One popular policy is to help parents find work, instead of relying solely on cash transfers, and this will contribute to change attitudes away from benefit dependency. It can be expected that such policies will reduce the stress and anxiety of children, and it will have a pay-off in a better socio-economic status they subsequently command.

Annette Hexelschneider | alfa
Further information:
http://www.euro.centre.org/list.php?ap_id=3&ap_name=Publications&type_id=6&type_name=Policy+Briefs

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Researchers simplify tiny structures' construction drip by drip
12.11.2018 | Princeton University, Engineering School

nachricht Mandibular movement monitoring may help improve oral sleep apnea devices
06.11.2018 | Elsevier

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Nonstop Tranport of Cargo in Nanomachines

Max Planck researchers revel the nano-structure of molecular trains and the reason for smooth transport in cellular antennas.

Moving around, sensing the extracellular environment, and signaling to other cells are important for a cell to function properly. Responsible for those tasks...

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Coherence Tomography: German-Japanese Research Alliance hosted Medical Imaging Conference

19.11.2018 | Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Sustainable energy supply in developing and emerging countries: What are the needs?

21.11.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Nonstop Tranport of Cargo in Nanomachines

20.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Researchers find social cultures in chimpanzees

20.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>