Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study Suggests Use Of Antithrombotics Means More Intracerebral Haemorrhagic Stroke Deaths In Over 75s

02.05.2007
A study suggests that the number of pensioners over 75 dying from intracerebral haemorrhagic stroke has increased in the last 25 years due to use of antithrombotic drugs. The findings are published early Online and in an upcoming edition of The Lancet Neurology

Antithrombotic drugs, such as aspirin, reduce the risk of strokes and heart attacks in people who are known to have vascular disease. However, there is no clear evidence of overall benefit in low risk healthy individuals, due mainly to the risk of bleeding complications, which are particularly common in the elderly. Yet, many healthy older people chose to take regular aspirin particularly in the hope of preventing a stroke.

Professor Peter Rothwell and colleagues at the University Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, UK, studied data from the Oxford Community Stroke Project (1981-85) and the Oxford Vascular Study (2002-06). They investigated incidence of intracerebral haemorrhagic stroke over time, for patients both above and below 75 years old, together with associated risk factors such as hypertension (high blood pressure) and medications.

The authors say: “Intracerebral haemorrhage is often disabling or fatal, and despite the promise of new acute therapies, prevention must remain the primary goal.”

The researchers found that incidence of such strokes associated with hypertension for both under and over 75s combined had fallen, largely due to a fall in average blood pressure over the time period of the study. But the proportion of cases in over-75s only had remained similar, in part due to increased intracerebral haemorrhage associated with antithrombotic (anti-blood clotting) drug use.

Whilst only 4% of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage were taking antithrombotic drugs in the 1981-85 study, this proportion had increased to 40% by the 2001-06 study. This increased use could explain the absence of the expected fall in rates of intracerebral haemorrhage in older patients that should have occurred due to falling average blood pressures over the 25 years.

The authors say their findings suggest that increasing use of antithrombotic agents may soon overtake poorly controlled blood pressure as the major risk factor for intracerebral haemorrhagic stroke in the over 75s.

The authors conclude: “This potential rise in the burden of intracerebral haemorrhage would not have been predicted from previous studies of mortality data, which were limited to the population under 75 years.

“Since at least two thirds of cases of intracerebral haemorrhage and 50% of all strokes occur above this age, it is essential to include the older population in studies of stroke.

“Antithrombotic drugs, such as aspirin, are undoubtedly of overall benefit in older patients with a definite indication, such as a previous heart attack or stroke, but our results emphasise the need for caution in advising widespread use of daily prophylactic aspirin in healthy older people who are not known to have vascular disease.”

In an accompanying comment, Dr Dawn Kleindorfer, director of the Stroke Prevention Programme Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky, USA, says: “Stabilisation of the incidence of stroke, especially the high morbidity and mortality associated subtybe of intracerebral haemorrhagic stroke, is not good news. As our population continues to age, the actual number of events will continue to increase, and overwhelm our already overburdened healthcare systems.

“We need to find new and better ways to prevent stroke and change behaviour of patients and physicians so that this stable incidence trend does not continue.”

Tony Kirby | alfa
Further information:
http://www.lancet.com

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Innovative genetic tests for children with developmental disorders and epilepsy
11.07.2018 | Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

nachricht Oxygen loss in the coastal Baltic Sea is “unprecedentedly severe”
05.07.2018 | European Geosciences Union

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microscopic trampoline may help create networks of quantum computers

17.07.2018 | Information Technology

In borophene, boundaries are no barrier

17.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

The role of Sodium for the Enhancement of Solar Cells

17.07.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>