Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Model helps explore patterns of urban sprawl and implicaitons for quality of life

21.02.2007
Americans like living in cities, and according to statistics in the United Nations World Population Database so do an increasing number of people throughout the world.

About 81 percent of the United States’ population now lives in urban areas, as does almost half of the world’s total population. Scientists and engineers say that as the trend continues there’s increasing urgency for societies to learn how to develop more sustainable urban environments.

Among them is John Crittenden, a civil and environmental engineering professor in Arizona State University’s Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering. Crittenden will give a presentation entitled "Decision Support for Urban Development: Integrating Air Quality, Material and Energy Flows, and Social Justice," on Feb. 19 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Crittenden will showcase a model he devised with ASU colleagues to predict patterns of urban sprawl and their implications for natural systems and quality of life for city-dwellers.

Using various social and environmental simulations (i.e., urban growth simulation, ground-level ozone simulation), the model is designed to forecast what the Phoenix metropolitan area might look like in 2015 based on projected development, and then determines many of the potential effects of that growth.

The model is intended to be used as a decision-making tool for local and state governments, civil engineers, business leaders and home owners who want to plan for growth that will avoid negative environmental consequences and protect the quality of life.

"This is really a first attempt to link social decision-making with construction methods and materials with the evaluation of local, regional and global impacts of those choices," Crittenden said. "We could reduce negative regional and global impacts of development by looking at alternative land-use patterns, construction methods and construction materials."

The AAAS annual meeting is the largest scientific conference in the United States, drawing experts and media from around the world to discuss contemporary issues in the field of science.

This year’s theme, "Science and Technology for Sustainable Well-Being," reflects the growing concern in the scientific community and among the general public about issues such as loss of biodiversity, unequal living standards throughout the world, weather-related disasters, proliferation of nuclear weapons and overdependence on petroleum.

Skip Derra | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.asu.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Researchers simplify tiny structures' construction drip by drip
12.11.2018 | Princeton University, Engineering School

nachricht Mandibular movement monitoring may help improve oral sleep apnea devices
06.11.2018 | Elsevier

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'

16.11.2018 | Health and Medicine

Good preparation is half the digestion

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Microscope measures muscle weakness

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>