Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Appetite-Inducing Hormone Receptor Found Active in Breast Cancer

12.04.2006


UC study is first to demonstrate that this specific receptor is working in breast cancer cells and can be “turned on” by excessive estrogen.



A hormone receptor with regulatory roles as diverse as food intake, fear response, and cardiovascular function may also be involved in breast cancer, according to UC researchers.

The UC research team, led by Hassane Amlal, PhD, and Sulaiman Sheriff, PhD, report their laboratory findings on the hormone, neuropeptide Y, and its receptor in the April edition of the journal Cancer Research.


Hassane Amlal, PhD, and Sulaiman Sheriff, PhD, believe there may be a link between neuropeptide Y’s receptor, Y1, and breast cancer development.

Earlier studies have shown that neuropeptide Y’s receptor, known as Y1, is overproduced in human ovarian, prostate and breast cancers. This study, however, is the first to demonstrate that the Y1 receptor is actually working in breast cancer cells and can be “turned on” by excessive estrogen—a known cause of about 60 to 70 percent of breast cancers, they say.

“The high incidence and activity of the Y1 receptor in human breast tumor cells suggests that it may play an important role in breast cancer,” explains Dr. Sheriff, a UC research assistant professor in the department of surgery.

Pilot data suggests that about 40 percent of all breast cancer patients have increased levels of the Y1 receptor, he says.

“We knew this receptor was overproduced in breast cancer tissue,” adds Dr. Amlal, a research assistant professor in the department of internal medicine, “but now the real question is what does it do in breast cancer cells, and how can we use it as a target to fight cancer.”

The UC researchers were able to slow the growth of breast cancer cells with abnormally high levels of the Y1 receptor by treating them with neuropeptide Y hormone produced by chemical synthesis.

“This finding gives us a promising new investigational target in the fight against breast cancer,” the authors report. “If we can find a way to selectively activate the Y1 receptor, we can limit breast cancer growth in the body.”

Further studies of the Y1 receptor’s role, they explain, may ultimately lead to more targeted drug therapy for many breast cancer patients.

According to the American Cancer Society, more than 214,000 women and men will be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2006. About 19 percent will die from the disease.

This study was sponsored by UC and the National Institutes of Health. The research team also included Somia Faroqui, and Ambikaipakan Balasubramaniam, PhD.

Amanda Harper | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uc.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Researchers simplify tiny structures' construction drip by drip
12.11.2018 | Princeton University, Engineering School

nachricht Mandibular movement monitoring may help improve oral sleep apnea devices
06.11.2018 | Elsevier

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Nonstop Tranport of Cargo in Nanomachines

Max Planck researchers revel the nano-structure of molecular trains and the reason for smooth transport in cellular antennas.

Moving around, sensing the extracellular environment, and signaling to other cells are important for a cell to function properly. Responsible for those tasks...

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Coherence Tomography: German-Japanese Research Alliance hosted Medical Imaging Conference

19.11.2018 | Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Sustainable energy supply in developing and emerging countries: What are the needs?

21.11.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Nonstop Tranport of Cargo in Nanomachines

20.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Researchers find social cultures in chimpanzees

20.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>