Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Large-scale study identifies key stress factors facing new mums

27.04.2005


Tiredness, feeding their baby and lack of time to care for other children are three of the key stresses experienced by new mothers, according to a study in the latest Journal of Advanced Nursing.



861 women who had given birth during the last six weeks were asked to rate 85 potential stress factors on a scale of one to five, with higher scores indicating greater stress levels.

The women were all married, had delivered a single, healthy, full-term baby without complications and had no major postnatal complications or underlying medical problems.


Professor Chich-Hsiu Hung from the Kaohsiung Medical University in Taiwan has used the results to up-date a test she developed 11 years ago, which enables healthcare professionals to identify and treat stress among new mothers.

Three key areas were identified as stressful by new mothers taking part in the study. They were concerned about their maternal role, negative physical and lifestyle changes and lack of social support.

• The three highest stress factors expressed by the new mothers were all personal factors - tiredness, lack of sleep and decreasing social activity.

• When it came to caring for their baby, they were most worried about feeding, looking after the umbilical cord, nappy changing and bathing the baby.

• Lack of social support was also stressful, with less time to care for other children, sibling rivalry and inadequate emotional support from their families heading the list.

“The period after a woman gives birth is a potentially stressful time during which she must face dramatic changes and new demands” says Professor Hung. “Until now, few studies have attempted to measure these stresses.”

The responses given by the new mothers to the 85 questions have enabled Professor Hung to develop an improved 61-item Hung Postpartum Stress Scale.

“This up-dated and improved stress scale can now be used by healthcare professionals to identify the stresses experienced by new mothers and provide them with appropriate advice, information or support” adds Professor Hung.

“It may also help us to prevent the serious health problems that can develop after a woman gives birth.”

Annette Whibley | alfa
Further information:
http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com
http://www.elhuyar.com

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Some brain tumors may respond to immunotherapy, new study suggests
11.12.2018 | Columbia University Irving Medical Center

nachricht Climate change and air pollution damaging health and causing millions of premature deaths
30.11.2018 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

Im Focus: The force of the vacuum

Scientists from the Theory Department of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg have shown through theoretical calculations and computer simulations that the force between electrons and lattice distortions in an atomically thin two-dimensional superconductor can be controlled with virtual photons. This could aid the development of new superconductors for energy-saving devices and many other technical applications.

The vacuum is not empty. It may sound like magic to laypeople but it has occupied physicists since the birth of quantum mechanics.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Some brain tumors may respond to immunotherapy, new study suggests

11.12.2018 | Studies and Analyses

Researchers image atomic structure of important immune regulator

11.12.2018 | Health and Medicine

Physicists edge closer to controlling chemical reactions

11.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>